Bipedicled flaps in posttraumatic lower-extremity reconstruction

Jay W. Granzow, Andrew Li, Ahmed Suliman, Amy Caton, Mytien Goldberg, J. Brian Boyd

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Complex, lower-extremity, soft-tissue defects pose a significant challenge to the reconstructive surgeon and often require the use of free flaps, which puts significant demands on the patient, the surgeon and the health-care system. Bipedicled flaps are random but receive a blood supply from two pedicles, allowing the surgeon to use local tissue with an augmented nutrient blood flow. They are simple to elevate and economical in operating time. This study describes our experience with lower-extremity wound reconstruction using the bipedicled flap as an alternative to pedicled flaps and free flaps. Methods Ten patients with lower-extremity defects underwent bipedicled flap reconstruction. Operative times, length of stay following flap procedure and postoperative complications were documented. Data were collected in a prospective fashion. Results Two patients had minimal areas of flap necrosis, both of which resolved with conservative local wound care and one patient developed a postoperative wound infection remedied with a course of oral antibiotics. We experienced one major complication involving wound dehiscence requiring an additional flap. Conclusions Bipedicled flaps provide a safe, fast and relatively easy alternative for coverage of certain complex open wounds in the lower extremities. Their use does not preclude the use of more traditional options of pedicled muscle or free flap coverage at a later time should they be required. Clinical questions addressed/Level of evidence: What are alternative strategies for lower-extremity wound reconstruction. Level of Evidence V.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1415-1420
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery
Volume66
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

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Lower Extremity
Free Tissue Flaps
Wounds and Injuries
Surgical Flaps
Surgical Wound Infection
Operative Time
Length of Stay
Patient Care
Necrosis
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Delivery of Health Care
Food
Muscles
Surgeons

Keywords

  • Bipedicled flap
  • Lower-extremity reconstruction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Bipedicled flaps in posttraumatic lower-extremity reconstruction. / Granzow, Jay W.; Li, Andrew; Suliman, Ahmed; Caton, Amy; Goldberg, Mytien; Boyd, J. Brian.

In: Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery, Vol. 66, No. 10, 01.10.2013, p. 1415-1420.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Granzow, Jay W. ; Li, Andrew ; Suliman, Ahmed ; Caton, Amy ; Goldberg, Mytien ; Boyd, J. Brian. / Bipedicled flaps in posttraumatic lower-extremity reconstruction. In: Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery. 2013 ; Vol. 66, No. 10. pp. 1415-1420.
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