Biomechanical comparison of 3.0 mm headless compression screw and 3.5 mm cortical bone screw in a canine humeral condylar fracture model

Mishka N. Gonsalves, Daniel A. Jankovits, Michael L. Huber, Adam M. Strom, Tanya C. Garcia, Susan M Stover

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To compare the biomechanical properties of simulated humeral condylar fractures reduced with one of two screw fixation methods: 3.0 mm headless compression screw (HCS) or 3.5 mm cortical bone screw (CBS) placed in lag fashion. Methods: Bilateral humeri were collected from nine canine cadavers. Standardized osteotomies were stabilized with 3.0 mm HCS in one limb and 3.5 mm CBS in the contralateral limb. Condylar fragments were loaded to walk, trot, and failure loads while measuring construct properties and condylar fragment motion. Results: The 3.5 mm CBS-stabilized constructs were 36% stiffer than 3.0 mm HCS-stabilized constructs, but differences were not apparent in quality of fracture reduction nor in yield loads, which exceeded expected physiological loads during rehabilitation. Small residual fragment displacements were not different between CBS and HCS screws. Small fragment rotation was not significantly different between screws, but was weakly correlated with moment arm length (R2 = 0.25). Clinical significance: A CBS screw placed in lag fashion provides stiffer fixation than an HCS screw, although both screws provide similar anatomical reduction and yield strength to condylar fracture fixation in adult canine humeri.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)353-360
Number of pages8
JournalVeterinary and Comparative Orthopaedics and Traumatology
Volume29
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2016

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humeral fractures
Bone Screws
Humeral Fractures
screws
Canidae
bones
dogs
Fracture Fixation
Humerus
Extremities
Osteotomy
Cadaver
Rehabilitation
Cortical Bone
humerus
limbs (animal)
fracture fixation

Keywords

  • Canine
  • Headless compression
  • Humeral condylar fracture
  • Lag screw

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Biomechanical comparison of 3.0 mm headless compression screw and 3.5 mm cortical bone screw in a canine humeral condylar fracture model. / Gonsalves, Mishka N.; Jankovits, Daniel A.; Huber, Michael L.; Strom, Adam M.; Garcia, Tanya C.; Stover, Susan M.

In: Veterinary and Comparative Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Vol. 29, No. 5, 2016, p. 353-360.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gonsalves, Mishka N. ; Jankovits, Daniel A. ; Huber, Michael L. ; Strom, Adam M. ; Garcia, Tanya C. ; Stover, Susan M. / Biomechanical comparison of 3.0 mm headless compression screw and 3.5 mm cortical bone screw in a canine humeral condylar fracture model. In: Veterinary and Comparative Orthopaedics and Traumatology. 2016 ; Vol. 29, No. 5. pp. 353-360.
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