Biologic behavior and prognostic factors for mast cell tumors of the canine muzzle: 24 Cases (1990-2001)

Tracy L. Gieger, Alain P Theon, Jonathan A. Werner, Margaret C. McEntee, Kenneth M. Rassnick, Hilde E V DeCock

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

61 Scopus citations

Abstract

The medical records of 24 dogs with histologically confirmed mast cell tumors (MCT) of the muzzle were retrospectively evaluated to determine their biologic behavior and prognostic factors. Information on signalment, tumor grade and stage, treatment methods, and pattern of and time to failure and death was obtained from the medical record. Twenty-three dogs were treated with combinations of radiotherapy, surgery, and chemotherapy; 1 dog received no treatment. There were 2 Grade I, 15 Grade II, and 7 Grade III tumors. Tumors were stage 0 (n = 8), stage 1 (5), stage 2 (6), stage 3 (4), and stage 4 (1). Mean and median survival times of treated dogs were 36 and 30 months, respectively. Prognostic factors affecting survival time included tumor grade and presence of metastasis at diagnosis. Dogs with Grade I and II tumors survived longer than dogs with Grade III tumors. Variables, including sex, age, gross versus microscopic disease, and treatment type were not found to affect survival. Local control rate was 75% at 1 year and 50% at 3 years. Tumor grade was the only variable found to affect local control. Dogs with Grade I tumors had longer disease-free intervals than those with Grade II tumors, and dogs with Grade II tumors had longer disease-free intervals than dogs with Grade III tumors. Eight of 9 dogs dying of MCT had local or regional disease progression. Muzzle MCT are biologically aggressive tumors with higher regional metastatic rates than previously reported for MCT in other sites.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)687-692
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Veterinary Internal Medicine
Volume17
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2003

Keywords

  • Canine skin tumors
  • Mastocytosis
  • Metastasis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

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