Biofilm formation of hypermucoviscous and non-hypermucoviscous Klebsiella pneumoniae recovered from clinically affected African green monkey (Chlorocebus aethiops sabaeus)

Esteban Soto Martinez, Michelle M. Dennis, Amy Beierschmitt, Stewart Francis, Fortune Sithole, Iona Halliday-Simmons, Roberta Palmour

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

In recent years, an emergent Klebsiella pneumoniae hypermucoviscous (HMV) phenotype has been associated with increased invasiveness and pathogenicity in primates. The HMV phenotype is characterized by different capsular serotypes, associated with several genes including the rmpA (regulator of mucoid phenotype) and magA (mucoviscosity-associated) genes. In African green monkeys (AGM) (Chlorocebus aethiops sabaeus) serotypes K1 and K5 have been implicated in fatal multisystemic abscesses. In order to better understand the epizootiology of this pathogen, the capacity of biofilm production of K. pneumoniae isolates presenting the HMV was compared to non-HMV isolates at three different temperatures (25, 30 and 37 °C). The results indicate that HMV and non-HMV isolates display similar capacity to form biofilms at the three different evaluated temperatures. Temperature appears to play a role in the formation of biofilms by K. pneumoniae presenting the HMV phenotype, where larger biofilms were formed at 37 °C than at 25 °C. Knowledge regarding local environmental sources of K. pneumoniae and the possible role of wildlife in the maintenance of this agent in the area is necessary to develop effective recommendations for the prevention and management of this disease in captive AGM populations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)198-201
Number of pages4
JournalMicrobial Pathogenesis
Volume107
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2017

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Cercopithecus aethiops
Klebsiella pneumoniae
Biofilms
Phenotype
Pneumonia
Temperature
Disease Management
Abscess
Primates
Genes
Virulence
Maintenance
Population
Serogroup

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Biofilm formation of hypermucoviscous and non-hypermucoviscous Klebsiella pneumoniae recovered from clinically affected African green monkey (Chlorocebus aethiops sabaeus). / Soto Martinez, Esteban; Dennis, Michelle M.; Beierschmitt, Amy; Francis, Stewart; Sithole, Fortune; Halliday-Simmons, Iona; Palmour, Roberta.

In: Microbial Pathogenesis, Vol. 107, 01.06.2017, p. 198-201.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Soto Martinez, Esteban ; Dennis, Michelle M. ; Beierschmitt, Amy ; Francis, Stewart ; Sithole, Fortune ; Halliday-Simmons, Iona ; Palmour, Roberta. / Biofilm formation of hypermucoviscous and non-hypermucoviscous Klebsiella pneumoniae recovered from clinically affected African green monkey (Chlorocebus aethiops sabaeus). In: Microbial Pathogenesis. 2017 ; Vol. 107. pp. 198-201.
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