Biochemical systems theory applied to the human red-blood cell

Ta Chen Ni, Michael A. Savageau

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Mathematical models of red cell metabolism have been developed within the framework of the Michaelis-Menten formalism, and the most comprehensive of these is currently being implemented as a computer simulation tool. A straightforward transformation to the synergistic-system representation within a very general theory of biochemical systems (called Biochemical Systems Theory or BST). Preliminary analysis aimed at characterizing the consistency, robustness, log gains, and accuracy of this model of the human red-blood cell is presented. The results show that the current model of the red cell exhibits a self-consistent and stable steady state. However, the model is not very robust; the high parameter sensitivities associated with the synthesis of NADP and glutathione suggest that this portion of the model is ill-conditioned. Signals propagated from independent to dependent variables are attenuated in some cases and amplified in others. These influences exhibit large values, both negative as well as positive. The accuracy with which the theory predicts responses to a 10%-variation of the independent variables is within 0.5% on the average.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Annual Conference on Engineering in Medicine and Biology
Place of PublicationPiscataway, NJ, United States
PublisherPubl by IEEE
Pages1543-1544
Number of pages2
Volume13
Editionpt 4
ISBN (Print)0780302168
StatePublished - 1991
Externally publishedYes
EventProceedings of the 13th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society - Orlando, FL, USA
Duration: Oct 31 1991Nov 3 1991

Other

OtherProceedings of the 13th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society
CityOrlando, FL, USA
Period10/31/9111/3/91

Fingerprint

System theory
Blood
Cells
NADP
Metabolism
Glutathione
Mathematical models
Computer simulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Bioengineering

Cite this

Ni, T. C., & Savageau, M. A. (1991). Biochemical systems theory applied to the human red-blood cell. In Proceedings of the Annual Conference on Engineering in Medicine and Biology (pt 4 ed., Vol. 13, pp. 1543-1544). Piscataway, NJ, United States: Publ by IEEE.

Biochemical systems theory applied to the human red-blood cell. / Ni, Ta Chen; Savageau, Michael A.

Proceedings of the Annual Conference on Engineering in Medicine and Biology. Vol. 13 pt 4. ed. Piscataway, NJ, United States : Publ by IEEE, 1991. p. 1543-1544.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Ni, TC & Savageau, MA 1991, Biochemical systems theory applied to the human red-blood cell. in Proceedings of the Annual Conference on Engineering in Medicine and Biology. pt 4 edn, vol. 13, Publ by IEEE, Piscataway, NJ, United States, pp. 1543-1544, Proceedings of the 13th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, Orlando, FL, USA, 10/31/91.
Ni TC, Savageau MA. Biochemical systems theory applied to the human red-blood cell. In Proceedings of the Annual Conference on Engineering in Medicine and Biology. pt 4 ed. Vol. 13. Piscataway, NJ, United States: Publ by IEEE. 1991. p. 1543-1544
Ni, Ta Chen ; Savageau, Michael A. / Biochemical systems theory applied to the human red-blood cell. Proceedings of the Annual Conference on Engineering in Medicine and Biology. Vol. 13 pt 4. ed. Piscataway, NJ, United States : Publ by IEEE, 1991. pp. 1543-1544
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