Biobehavioral composite of social aspects of anxiety in young adults with fragile X syndrome contrasted to autism spectrum disorder

Jane E. Roberts, Jordan E. Ezell, Amanda J. Fairchild, Jessica Klusek, Angela J. Thurman, Andrea McDuffie, Leonard J Abbeduto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Social anxiety is a common disorder that has negative impacts across multiple domains of function. Several clinical groups are at elevated risk for social anxiety, including those with fragile X syndrome and those with autism spectrum disorder. Measuring social anxiety in these clinical subgroups is fraught with challenge, however, given the complexity of social anxiety and measurement limitations that are particularly acute in persons with neurodevelopmental disorders. The over-arching aim of this study was to contribute to our understanding of the nature of social anxiety in fragile X syndrome and its association with autism spectrum disorder. To address this aim, we created a multi-faceted composite representing behavioral and biological aspects of social anxiety and examined differences in two adolescent and young adult-aged groups: 59 males with fragile X syndrome and 18 males with autism spectrum disorder. Results indicated a lower score on the multivariate composite for the males with fragile X syndrome relative to autism spectrum disorder but with evidence that traits of autism and social anxiety overlap. We conclude that measuring anxiety and autism traits in fragile X syndrome and autism spectrum disorder is complex with features that overlap and interact in a dynamic manner.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Medical Genetics, Part B: Neuropsychiatric Genetics
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics(clinical)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

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