Behavioral adaptations to parasites: An ethological approach

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

78 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Wild vertebrate animals must live in an environment with the ever present threat of internal and external parasites. This threat by macroparasites is responsible for the natural selection of an array of behavioral adaptations that, together with the immune system and other physiological forms of resistance, enable the animals to survive and reproduce in this environment. Several lines of research, some quite recent, illustrate that specific behavioral patterns can be effective in helping animals or their offspring avoid or control macroparasites that can affect adversely the animal's fitness. These behavioral patterns fall under the general strategies of avoidance behavior and mate selection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)256-265
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Parasitology
Volume78
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1992

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parasite
Parasites
parasites
animal
Avoidance Learning
animals
Wild Animals
Genetic Selection
Marriage
avoidance behavior
Vertebrates
Immune System
immune system
natural selection
vertebrate
fitness
vertebrates
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Cite this

Behavioral adaptations to parasites : An ethological approach. / Hart, Benjamin.

In: Journal of Parasitology, Vol. 78, No. 2, 01.01.1992, p. 256-265.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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