Behavioral Activation as an Early Intervention for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Depression Among Physically Injured Trauma Survivors

Amy W. Wagner, Douglas F. Zatzick, Angela Ghesquiere, Gregory Jurkovich

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

72 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper describes an adaptation of behavioral activation (BA) for the early intervention of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression among physically injured survivors of traumatic injury, and presents pilot data on a small randomized effectiveness trial (N = 8). The application of BA to PTSD is based on the theory that increases in guided activity may break patterns of avoidance that can maintain PTSD. Compared to treatment as usual (TAU), those who received BA showed improvement in PTSD symptom severity from pre- to posttreatment, and there was a trend for the BA group to score better than the TAU group on physical functioning. Contrary to expectation, this brief adaptation did not have an impact on depression. Implications of these results for the effective early intervention after trauma are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)341-349
Number of pages9
JournalCognitive and Behavioral Practice
Volume14
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders
Depression
Wounds and Injuries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Behavioral Activation as an Early Intervention for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Depression Among Physically Injured Trauma Survivors. / Wagner, Amy W.; Zatzick, Douglas F.; Ghesquiere, Angela; Jurkovich, Gregory.

In: Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, Vol. 14, No. 4, 01.11.2007, p. 341-349.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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