Beating heart surgery: Why expect less central nervous system morbidity?

John M. Murkin, Walter D Boyd, Sugantha Ganapathy, Sandra J. Adams, Rhonda C. Peterson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

124 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. The incidence and etiology of brain dysfunction after conventional coronary artery bypass surgery using cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) are reviewed. Methods. Stroke rates and incidences of cognitive dysfunction from various studies are considered. Mechanisms of injury including cerebral embolization as detected by transcranial Doppler and retinal angiography, and imaging-based evidence for postoperative cerebral edema, are discussed. Preliminary results from a prospective clinical trial assessing cognitive dysfunction after beating heart versus conventional coronary artery bypass with CPB are discussed. Results. Initial evidence for lower overall postoperative morbidity, and for a lower incidence of cognitive dysfunction specifically, after nonpump coronary revascularization is presented. Conclusions. Beating heart surgery results in less potential for generation of cerebral emboli and appears to produce a lower incidence of cognitive dysfunction in both short- and intermediate-term postoperative follow-up periods as compared with conventional coronary artery bypass surgery using CPB.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1498-1501
Number of pages4
JournalAnnals of Thoracic Surgery
Volume68
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1999
Externally publishedYes

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Thoracic Surgery
Central Nervous System
Cardiopulmonary Bypass
Coronary Artery Bypass
Morbidity
Incidence
Intracranial Embolism
Brain Edema
Angiography
Stroke
Clinical Trials
Cognitive Dysfunction
Wounds and Injuries
Brain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Surgery

Cite this

Murkin, J. M., Boyd, W. D., Ganapathy, S., Adams, S. J., & Peterson, R. C. (1999). Beating heart surgery: Why expect less central nervous system morbidity? Annals of Thoracic Surgery, 68(4), 1498-1501. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0003-4975(99)00953-4

Beating heart surgery : Why expect less central nervous system morbidity? / Murkin, John M.; Boyd, Walter D; Ganapathy, Sugantha; Adams, Sandra J.; Peterson, Rhonda C.

In: Annals of Thoracic Surgery, Vol. 68, No. 4, 10.1999, p. 1498-1501.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Murkin, JM, Boyd, WD, Ganapathy, S, Adams, SJ & Peterson, RC 1999, 'Beating heart surgery: Why expect less central nervous system morbidity?', Annals of Thoracic Surgery, vol. 68, no. 4, pp. 1498-1501. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0003-4975(99)00953-4
Murkin, John M. ; Boyd, Walter D ; Ganapathy, Sugantha ; Adams, Sandra J. ; Peterson, Rhonda C. / Beating heart surgery : Why expect less central nervous system morbidity?. In: Annals of Thoracic Surgery. 1999 ; Vol. 68, No. 4. pp. 1498-1501.
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