Bearing false witness under pressure: Implicit and explicit components of stereotype-driven memory distortions

Jeffrey Sherman, Carla J. Groom, Katja Ehrenberg, Karl Christoph Klauer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This research asked why people falsely remember stereotype-consistent information when cognitive resources are depleted. A task adapted from Jacoby's (1991) process dissociation procedure assessed participants' ability to distinguish between distractor items and behaviors performed by a stereotyped target. A multinomial analysis revealed that when cognitive capacity was restricted, participants were less likely to base judgments of stereotype-consistent behaviors on recollection and more likely to respond based on the mere familiarity of the behaviors. Capacity depletion did not affect the basis for judging stereotype-inconsistent items, nor did depletion promote simple stereotype-consistent response bias. We discuss the implications for stereotyping and eyewitness testimony.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)213-246
Number of pages34
JournalSocial Cognition
Volume21
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

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Pressure
Stereotyping
Aptitude
Research
Recognition (Psychology)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Bearing false witness under pressure : Implicit and explicit components of stereotype-driven memory distortions. / Sherman, Jeffrey; Groom, Carla J.; Ehrenberg, Katja; Klauer, Karl Christoph.

In: Social Cognition, Vol. 21, No. 3, 01.06.2003, p. 213-246.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sherman, Jeffrey ; Groom, Carla J. ; Ehrenberg, Katja ; Klauer, Karl Christoph. / Bearing false witness under pressure : Implicit and explicit components of stereotype-driven memory distortions. In: Social Cognition. 2003 ; Vol. 21, No. 3. pp. 213-246.
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