Basal bioenergetic abnormalities in skeletal muscle from ryanodine receptor malignant hyperthermia-susceptible R163C knock-in mice

Cecilia R Giulivi, Catherine Ross-Inta, Alicja Omanska-Klusek, Eleonora Napoli, Danielle Sakaguchi, Genaro Barrientos, Paul D. Allen, Isaac N Pessah

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Scopus citations

Abstract

Malignant hyperthermia (MH) and central core disease in humans have been associated with mutations in the skeletal ryanodine receptor (RyR1). Heterozygous mice expressing the human MH/central core disease RyR1 R163C mutation exhibit MH when exposed to halothane or heat stress. Considering that many MH symptoms resemble those that could ensue from a mitochondrial dysfunction (e.g. metabolic acidosis and hyperthermia) and that MH-susceptible mice or humans have a higher than normal cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration at rest, we evaluated the role of mitochondria in skeletal muscle from R163C compared with wild type mice under basal (untriggered) conditions. R163C skeletal muscle exhibited a significant increase in matrix Ca 2+, increased reactive oxygen species production, lower expression of mitochondrial proteins, and higher mtDNA copy number. These changes, in conjunction with lower myoglobin and glycogen contents, Myh4 and GAPDH transcript levels, GAPDH activity, and lower glucose utilization suggested a switch to a compromised bioenergetic state characterized by both low oxidative phosphorylation and glycolysis. The shift in bioenergetic state was accompanied by a dysregulation of Ca2+-responsive signaling pathways regulated by calcineurin and ERK1/2. Chronically elevated resting Ca2+ in R163C skeletal muscle elicited the maintenance of a fast-twitch fiber program and the development of insulin resistance-like phenotype as part of a metabolic adaptation to the R163C RyR1 mutation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)99-113
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
Volume286
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 7 2011

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology
  • Molecular Biology

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