Bartonella infection in shelter cats and dogs and their ectoparasites

Yi Lun Tsai, Chao Chen Lin, Bruno B Chomel, Shih Te Chuang, Kun Hsien Tsai, Wen Jer Wu, Chin Gi Huang, Jiann Chung Yu, Min Hua Sung, Philip H Kass, Chao Chin Chang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mainly through vector transmission, domestic cats and dogs are infected by several Bartonella spp. and represent a large reservoir for human infections. This study investigated the relationship of prevalences of Bartonella infection in shelter dogs and cats and various ectoparasite species infesting them (fleas, ticks, and lice). Moreover, relationships between Bartonella infection and animal gender and age and presence of ectoparasites were analyzed. Blood samples were collected from 120 dogs and 103 cats. There were 386 ticks and 36 fleas harvested on these dogs, and 141 fleas, 4 ticks, and 2 lice harvested on these cats. Isolation/detection of Bartonella sp. was performed by culture, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and partial sequencing. Bartonella was isolated from 21 (20.4%) cats and detected by PCR from 20 (19.4%) cats, 2 (1.7%) dogs, 55 (39%) fleas collected from cats, 28 (10%) ticks DNA samples, and 1 (2.8%) flea collected from dogs. When combining culture and PCR data, 27 cats and 55 fleas collected on cats were positive for Bartonella henselae or Bartonella clarridgeiae, but none were coinfected. Approximately half of the B. henselae isolates from 21 cats were B. henselae type I. Moreover, B. henselae, Bartonella phoceensis, Bartonella queenslandensis, Bartonella rattimassiliensis, Bartonella elizabethae DNA was detected in ticks collected from dogs and one flea was B. clarridgeiae PCR positive. This is the first report of such a wide variety of Bartonella spp. detected in Rhipicephalus sanguineus. Further studies are required to understand the relative importance of these ectoparasites to transmit Bartonella spp. in dogs and cats.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1023-1030
Number of pages8
JournalVector-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases
Volume11
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2011

Fingerprint

Bartonella Infections
Bartonella
Cats
Dogs
Siphonaptera
Bartonella henselae
Ticks
Ctenocephalides
Phthiraptera
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Rhipicephalus sanguineus
DNA

Keywords

  • Bartonella spp.
  • Cat
  • Dog
  • Flea
  • Taiwan
  • Tick

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Microbiology
  • Virology

Cite this

Tsai, Y. L., Lin, C. C., Chomel, B. B., Chuang, S. T., Tsai, K. H., Wu, W. J., ... Chang, C. C. (2011). Bartonella infection in shelter cats and dogs and their ectoparasites. Vector-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases, 11(8), 1023-1030. https://doi.org/10.1089/vbz.2010.0085

Bartonella infection in shelter cats and dogs and their ectoparasites. / Tsai, Yi Lun; Lin, Chao Chen; Chomel, Bruno B; Chuang, Shih Te; Tsai, Kun Hsien; Wu, Wen Jer; Huang, Chin Gi; Yu, Jiann Chung; Sung, Min Hua; Kass, Philip H; Chang, Chao Chin.

In: Vector-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases, Vol. 11, No. 8, 01.08.2011, p. 1023-1030.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tsai, YL, Lin, CC, Chomel, BB, Chuang, ST, Tsai, KH, Wu, WJ, Huang, CG, Yu, JC, Sung, MH, Kass, PH & Chang, CC 2011, 'Bartonella infection in shelter cats and dogs and their ectoparasites', Vector-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases, vol. 11, no. 8, pp. 1023-1030. https://doi.org/10.1089/vbz.2010.0085
Tsai, Yi Lun ; Lin, Chao Chen ; Chomel, Bruno B ; Chuang, Shih Te ; Tsai, Kun Hsien ; Wu, Wen Jer ; Huang, Chin Gi ; Yu, Jiann Chung ; Sung, Min Hua ; Kass, Philip H ; Chang, Chao Chin. / Bartonella infection in shelter cats and dogs and their ectoparasites. In: Vector-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases. 2011 ; Vol. 11, No. 8. pp. 1023-1030.
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