Bartonella infection in hematophagous, insectivorous, and phytophagous bat populations of Central Mexico and the Yucatan Peninsula

Matthew J. Stuckey, Bruno B Chomel, Guillermo Galvez-Romero, José Ignacio Olave-Leyva, Cirani Obregón-Morales, Hayde Moreno-Sandoval, Nidia Aréchiga-Ceballos, Mónica Salas-Rojas, Alvaro Aguilar-Setién

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although emerging nonviral pathogens remain relatively understudied in bat populations, there is an increasing focus on identifying bat-associated bartonellae around the world. Many novel Bartonella strains have been described from both bats and their arthropod ectoparasites, including Bartonella mayotimonensis, a zoonotic agent of human endocarditis. This cross-sectional study was designed to describe novel Bartonella strains isolated from bats sampled in Mexico and evaluate factors potentially associated with infection. A total of 238 bats belonging to seven genera were captured in five states of Central Mexico and the Yucatan Peninsula. Animals were screened by bacterial culture from whole blood and/or polymerase chain reaction of DNA extracted from heart tissue or blood. Bartonella spp. were isolated or detected in 54 (22.7%) bats, consisting of 41 (38%) hematophagous, 10 (16.4%) insectivorous, and three (4.3%) phytophagous individuals. This study also identified Balantiopteryx plicata as another possible bat reservoir of Bartonella. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression models suggested that Bartonella infection was positively associated with blood-feeding diet and ectoparasite burden. Phylogenetic analysis identified a number of genetic variants across hematophagous, phytophagous, and insectivorous bats that are unique from described bat-borne Bartonella species. However, these strains were closely related to those bartonellae previously identified in bat species from Latin America.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)413-422
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume97
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2017

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Bartonella Infections
Mexico
Bartonella
Population
Logistic Models
Latin America
Arthropods
Zoonoses
Endocarditis
Cross-Sectional Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Virology

Cite this

Bartonella infection in hematophagous, insectivorous, and phytophagous bat populations of Central Mexico and the Yucatan Peninsula. / Stuckey, Matthew J.; Chomel, Bruno B; Galvez-Romero, Guillermo; Olave-Leyva, José Ignacio; Obregón-Morales, Cirani; Moreno-Sandoval, Hayde; Aréchiga-Ceballos, Nidia; Salas-Rojas, Mónica; Aguilar-Setién, Alvaro.

In: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, Vol. 97, No. 2, 2017, p. 413-422.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Stuckey, MJ, Chomel, BB, Galvez-Romero, G, Olave-Leyva, JI, Obregón-Morales, C, Moreno-Sandoval, H, Aréchiga-Ceballos, N, Salas-Rojas, M & Aguilar-Setién, A 2017, 'Bartonella infection in hematophagous, insectivorous, and phytophagous bat populations of Central Mexico and the Yucatan Peninsula', American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, vol. 97, no. 2, pp. 413-422. https://doi.org/10.4269/ajtmh.16-0680
Stuckey, Matthew J. ; Chomel, Bruno B ; Galvez-Romero, Guillermo ; Olave-Leyva, José Ignacio ; Obregón-Morales, Cirani ; Moreno-Sandoval, Hayde ; Aréchiga-Ceballos, Nidia ; Salas-Rojas, Mónica ; Aguilar-Setién, Alvaro. / Bartonella infection in hematophagous, insectivorous, and phytophagous bat populations of Central Mexico and the Yucatan Peninsula. In: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. 2017 ; Vol. 97, No. 2. pp. 413-422.
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