Balloon Valvuloplasty of Tricuspid Stenosis: A Retrospective Study of 5 Labrador Retriever Dogs

G. A. Lake-Bakaar, L. G. Griffiths, Mark D Kittleson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: There are limited reports of severe tricuspid valve stenosis in dogs and limited data regarding treatment and outcome. Objective: To evaluate clinical signs, echocardiographic features, and outcome of balloon valvuloplasty (BV) in dogs with severe tricuspid valve stenosis (TVS) in which BV was attempted. Animals: Five client-owned dogs with severe TVS. Methods: Records were retrospectively reviewed and data collected regarding signalment, clinical signs, diagnostic findings, procedures, and outcome. Results: All dogs were Labrador Retrievers. Presenting complaints included episodic weakness/syncope (4/5), abdominal distension (4/5), lethargy (2/5), and exercise intolerance (2/5). The median and range of measurements before BV were as follows: TV mean velocity 1.5 m/s (range 1.4–1.7 m/s); velocity-time integral (VTI) 79.8 cm (42.4–99.1 cm); and TV maximum velocity 2.9 m/s (2.3–3.2 m/s). Measurements (available for 3 of 5 dogs) after BV were as follows: TV mean velocity 1.15 m/s (0.9–1.4 m/s); VTI 44.95 cm (41.4–54.8 cm); and TV maximum velocity 1.15 m/s (1.9–2.3 m/s). The procedure was attempted in all dogs and completed in 4/5 dogs. The largest balloon diameter ranged from 15 mm to 25 mm, and length ranged from 4 cm to 5 cm. Right atrial pressure decreased in 4/5 dogs. All but 1 dog had clinical improvement after BV, but recurrence of clinical signs occurred (2/5). Tricuspid regurgitation worsened in 1 dog culminating in right heart failure and euthanasia. Conclusions and Clinical Importance: BV can be an effective treatment; however, clinical signs can recur. Right heart failure due to worsened TR is a potential complication in dogs with pre-existing moderate-to-severe TR.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)311-315
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Veterinary Internal Medicine
Volume31
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2017

Fingerprint

Balloon Valvuloplasty
Newfoundland and Labrador
Labrador Retriever
retrospective studies
Pathologic Constriction
Retrospective Studies
Dogs
dogs
Tricuspid Valve Stenosis
heart failure
Heart Failure
syncope
Tricuspid Valve Insufficiency
Lethargy
Atrial Pressure
Euthanasia
Syncope
euthanasia
exercise

Keywords

  • Interventional cardiology
  • Tricuspid dysplasia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Balloon Valvuloplasty of Tricuspid Stenosis : A Retrospective Study of 5 Labrador Retriever Dogs. / Lake-Bakaar, G. A.; Griffiths, L. G.; Kittleson, Mark D.

In: Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine, Vol. 31, No. 2, 01.03.2017, p. 311-315.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AB - Background: There are limited reports of severe tricuspid valve stenosis in dogs and limited data regarding treatment and outcome. Objective: To evaluate clinical signs, echocardiographic features, and outcome of balloon valvuloplasty (BV) in dogs with severe tricuspid valve stenosis (TVS) in which BV was attempted. Animals: Five client-owned dogs with severe TVS. Methods: Records were retrospectively reviewed and data collected regarding signalment, clinical signs, diagnostic findings, procedures, and outcome. Results: All dogs were Labrador Retrievers. Presenting complaints included episodic weakness/syncope (4/5), abdominal distension (4/5), lethargy (2/5), and exercise intolerance (2/5). The median and range of measurements before BV were as follows: TV mean velocity 1.5 m/s (range 1.4–1.7 m/s); velocity-time integral (VTI) 79.8 cm (42.4–99.1 cm); and TV maximum velocity 2.9 m/s (2.3–3.2 m/s). Measurements (available for 3 of 5 dogs) after BV were as follows: TV mean velocity 1.15 m/s (0.9–1.4 m/s); VTI 44.95 cm (41.4–54.8 cm); and TV maximum velocity 1.15 m/s (1.9–2.3 m/s). The procedure was attempted in all dogs and completed in 4/5 dogs. The largest balloon diameter ranged from 15 mm to 25 mm, and length ranged from 4 cm to 5 cm. Right atrial pressure decreased in 4/5 dogs. All but 1 dog had clinical improvement after BV, but recurrence of clinical signs occurred (2/5). Tricuspid regurgitation worsened in 1 dog culminating in right heart failure and euthanasia. Conclusions and Clinical Importance: BV can be an effective treatment; however, clinical signs can recur. Right heart failure due to worsened TR is a potential complication in dogs with pre-existing moderate-to-severe TR.

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