Bacterial vaginosis (BV) and the risk of incident gonococcal or chlamydial genital infection in a predominantly black population

Roberta B. Ness, Kevin E. Kip, David E. Soper, Sharon Hillier, Carol A. Stamm, Richard L Sweet, Peter Rice, Holley E. Richter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The objective of this study was to assess in prospective data whether bacterial vaginosis (BV) is associated with gonococcal/chlamydial cervicitis. Study: A total of 1179 women at high risk for sexually transmitted infections was followed for a median of 3 years. Every 6 to 12 months, vaginal swabs were obtained for Gram stain, culture of microflora, and Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis. A Gram stain score of 7 to 10 based on the Nugent criteria categorized BV. Results: Baseline BV was associated with concurrent gonococcal/chlamydial infection (adjusted odds ratio, 2.83; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.81-4.42). However, the association between BV and subsequent, incident gonococcal/chlamydial genital infection was not significant (adjusted relative risk [RR], 1.52; 95% CI, 0.74-3.13). Dense growth of pigmented, anaerobic Gram-negative rods (adjusted RR, 1.93; 95% CI, 0.97-3.83) appeared to elevate the risk for newly acquired gonococcal/chlamydial genital infection. Conclusions: BV was common among a predominantly black group of women with concurrent gonococcal/chlamydial infection but did not elevate the risk for incident infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)413-417
Number of pages5
JournalSexually Transmitted Diseases
Volume32
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2005

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Bacterial Vaginosis
Infection
Population
Confidence Intervals
Uterine Cervicitis
Neisseria gonorrhoeae
Chlamydia trachomatis
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Odds Ratio
Growth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

Bacterial vaginosis (BV) and the risk of incident gonococcal or chlamydial genital infection in a predominantly black population. / Ness, Roberta B.; Kip, Kevin E.; Soper, David E.; Hillier, Sharon; Stamm, Carol A.; Sweet, Richard L; Rice, Peter; Richter, Holley E.

In: Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Vol. 32, No. 7, 07.2005, p. 413-417.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ness, Roberta B. ; Kip, Kevin E. ; Soper, David E. ; Hillier, Sharon ; Stamm, Carol A. ; Sweet, Richard L ; Rice, Peter ; Richter, Holley E. / Bacterial vaginosis (BV) and the risk of incident gonococcal or chlamydial genital infection in a predominantly black population. In: Sexually Transmitted Diseases. 2005 ; Vol. 32, No. 7. pp. 413-417.
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