Bacterial contamination of colostrum fed to newborn calves in Québec dairy herds

Gilles Fecteau, Paul Baillargeon, Robert Higgins, Julie Paré, Madeleine Fortin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A convenience sample of 234 colostral specimens, collected directly from the nursing bottle immediately prior to the first feeding, was studied. Samples originated from 6 farms and were collected over 24 months. Routine bacteriologic techniques were used to quantify the bacterial load of the colostrum, as well as to identify the bacteria. Overall, at least 1 microorganism was cultured from 221 colostral samples (94.4%). By using the upper tolerance level of 100 000 bacteria/mL, 84 samples (35.9%) were considered contaminated. Staphylococcus spp. (57.7%), gram-negative rods (47.9%), coliforms (44.0%), and Streptococcus uberis (20.5%) were among the most frequently isolated bacteria. The relative risk (RR) of contamination with more than 100 000 bacteria/mL was significantly greater in warm months [RR = 2.55, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.63 to 4.02] than in cool months and in colostrum offered to male calves (RR = 1.55, 95% CI: 1.09 to 2.20). Bacterial load was also associated with the farm of origin (P < 0.0001). When assessing colostrum management, one should consider bacterial contamination. Multiple factors are likely associated with the degree of contamination, and farm-specific factors may be important. Further studies are necessary to evaluate the impact of bacterial contamination of colostrum on neonatal health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)523-527
Number of pages5
JournalCanadian Veterinary Journal
Volume43
Issue number7
StatePublished - Jul 22 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Colostrum
bacterial contamination
colostrum
dairy herds
neonates
relative risk
calves
Bacteria
Bacterial Load
bacteria
farms
confidence interval
Bacteriological Techniques
Confidence Intervals
Streptococcus uberis
sampling
Streptococcus
Staphylococcus
bottles
Nursing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Fecteau, G., Baillargeon, P., Higgins, R., Paré, J., & Fortin, M. (2002). Bacterial contamination of colostrum fed to newborn calves in Québec dairy herds. Canadian Veterinary Journal, 43(7), 523-527.

Bacterial contamination of colostrum fed to newborn calves in Québec dairy herds. / Fecteau, Gilles; Baillargeon, Paul; Higgins, Robert; Paré, Julie; Fortin, Madeleine.

In: Canadian Veterinary Journal, Vol. 43, No. 7, 22.07.2002, p. 523-527.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fecteau, G, Baillargeon, P, Higgins, R, Paré, J & Fortin, M 2002, 'Bacterial contamination of colostrum fed to newborn calves in Québec dairy herds', Canadian Veterinary Journal, vol. 43, no. 7, pp. 523-527.
Fecteau, Gilles ; Baillargeon, Paul ; Higgins, Robert ; Paré, Julie ; Fortin, Madeleine. / Bacterial contamination of colostrum fed to newborn calves in Québec dairy herds. In: Canadian Veterinary Journal. 2002 ; Vol. 43, No. 7. pp. 523-527.
@article{7160ab8d4eff443abcb9646ed83daa6d,
title = "Bacterial contamination of colostrum fed to newborn calves in Qu{\'e}bec dairy herds",
abstract = "A convenience sample of 234 colostral specimens, collected directly from the nursing bottle immediately prior to the first feeding, was studied. Samples originated from 6 farms and were collected over 24 months. Routine bacteriologic techniques were used to quantify the bacterial load of the colostrum, as well as to identify the bacteria. Overall, at least 1 microorganism was cultured from 221 colostral samples (94.4{\%}). By using the upper tolerance level of 100 000 bacteria/mL, 84 samples (35.9{\%}) were considered contaminated. Staphylococcus spp. (57.7{\%}), gram-negative rods (47.9{\%}), coliforms (44.0{\%}), and Streptococcus uberis (20.5{\%}) were among the most frequently isolated bacteria. The relative risk (RR) of contamination with more than 100 000 bacteria/mL was significantly greater in warm months [RR = 2.55, 95{\%} confidence interval (CI): 1.63 to 4.02] than in cool months and in colostrum offered to male calves (RR = 1.55, 95{\%} CI: 1.09 to 2.20). Bacterial load was also associated with the farm of origin (P < 0.0001). When assessing colostrum management, one should consider bacterial contamination. Multiple factors are likely associated with the degree of contamination, and farm-specific factors may be important. Further studies are necessary to evaluate the impact of bacterial contamination of colostrum on neonatal health.",
author = "Gilles Fecteau and Paul Baillargeon and Robert Higgins and Julie Par{\'e} and Madeleine Fortin",
year = "2002",
month = "7",
day = "22",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "43",
pages = "523--527",
journal = "Canadian Veterinary Journal",
issn = "0008-5286",
publisher = "Canadian Veterinary Medical Association",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Bacterial contamination of colostrum fed to newborn calves in Québec dairy herds

AU - Fecteau, Gilles

AU - Baillargeon, Paul

AU - Higgins, Robert

AU - Paré, Julie

AU - Fortin, Madeleine

PY - 2002/7/22

Y1 - 2002/7/22

N2 - A convenience sample of 234 colostral specimens, collected directly from the nursing bottle immediately prior to the first feeding, was studied. Samples originated from 6 farms and were collected over 24 months. Routine bacteriologic techniques were used to quantify the bacterial load of the colostrum, as well as to identify the bacteria. Overall, at least 1 microorganism was cultured from 221 colostral samples (94.4%). By using the upper tolerance level of 100 000 bacteria/mL, 84 samples (35.9%) were considered contaminated. Staphylococcus spp. (57.7%), gram-negative rods (47.9%), coliforms (44.0%), and Streptococcus uberis (20.5%) were among the most frequently isolated bacteria. The relative risk (RR) of contamination with more than 100 000 bacteria/mL was significantly greater in warm months [RR = 2.55, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.63 to 4.02] than in cool months and in colostrum offered to male calves (RR = 1.55, 95% CI: 1.09 to 2.20). Bacterial load was also associated with the farm of origin (P < 0.0001). When assessing colostrum management, one should consider bacterial contamination. Multiple factors are likely associated with the degree of contamination, and farm-specific factors may be important. Further studies are necessary to evaluate the impact of bacterial contamination of colostrum on neonatal health.

AB - A convenience sample of 234 colostral specimens, collected directly from the nursing bottle immediately prior to the first feeding, was studied. Samples originated from 6 farms and were collected over 24 months. Routine bacteriologic techniques were used to quantify the bacterial load of the colostrum, as well as to identify the bacteria. Overall, at least 1 microorganism was cultured from 221 colostral samples (94.4%). By using the upper tolerance level of 100 000 bacteria/mL, 84 samples (35.9%) were considered contaminated. Staphylococcus spp. (57.7%), gram-negative rods (47.9%), coliforms (44.0%), and Streptococcus uberis (20.5%) were among the most frequently isolated bacteria. The relative risk (RR) of contamination with more than 100 000 bacteria/mL was significantly greater in warm months [RR = 2.55, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.63 to 4.02] than in cool months and in colostrum offered to male calves (RR = 1.55, 95% CI: 1.09 to 2.20). Bacterial load was also associated with the farm of origin (P < 0.0001). When assessing colostrum management, one should consider bacterial contamination. Multiple factors are likely associated with the degree of contamination, and farm-specific factors may be important. Further studies are necessary to evaluate the impact of bacterial contamination of colostrum on neonatal health.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0036304502&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0036304502&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 12125183

AN - SCOPUS:0036304502

VL - 43

SP - 523

EP - 527

JO - Canadian Veterinary Journal

JF - Canadian Veterinary Journal

SN - 0008-5286

IS - 7

ER -