Avian scleroderma: Evidence for qualitative and quantitative T cell defects

Trevor J. Wilson, Judith A Van de Water, Frederick C Mohr, Richard L. Boyd, Aftab Ansari, Georg Wick, M. Eric Gershwin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

T cell activation is dependent upon calcium influx and protein kinase C activation, with subsequent lymphocyte proliferation dependent upon IL-2. Abnormalities in T cell proliferation, including abnormal calcium influx and defective protein kinase C activation, have been identified in aged mice and humans and many autoimmune diseases including diabetes, lupus and scleroderma. Since UCD line 200 chickens, which spontaneously develop a scleroderma-like disease, have both thymic defects and a diminished peripheral blood lymphocyte response to IL-2, we have further investigated T cell function in these birds. Interestingly, line 200 T cells respond poorly in vitro to a variety of diversely acting T cell mitogens including concanavalin A, phytohemagglutinin and anti-chicken CD3 monoclonal antibody. Moreover, they do not respond well even to phorbol myristate acetate in conjunction with ionomycin. Addition of exogenous IL-2-containing supernatant concurrently with mitogenic stimulation also had no significant effect. Analysis of intracellular free calcium demonstrated that the lymphocytes from diseased birds had a reduced influx of calcium (or release for intracellular stores) following stimulation. These data clearly reflect a unique defect in T cell activation associated with avian scleroderma. Analysis of chicken CD3, CD4 and CD8 expression revealed a 39% decrease in peripheral blood CD4+ cells in scleroderma birds, although this decrease was not sufficient to explain the 80-90% decrease observed in proliferation assays and calcium influx. Our data support the hypothesis that avian scleroderma is mediated via abnormal function of lymphocyte co-stimulatory molecules or intracellular calcium regulators.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)261-276
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Autoimmunity
Volume5
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1992

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Calcium
T-Lymphocytes
Lymphocytes
Interleukin-2
Chickens
Protein Kinase C
Birds
Bird Diseases
Ionomycin
Phytohemagglutinins
Tetradecanoylphorbol Acetate
Concanavalin A
Mitogens
Autoimmune Diseases
Blood Cells
Monoclonal Antibodies
Cell Proliferation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

Avian scleroderma : Evidence for qualitative and quantitative T cell defects. / Wilson, Trevor J.; Van de Water, Judith A; Mohr, Frederick C; Boyd, Richard L.; Ansari, Aftab; Wick, Georg; Gershwin, M. Eric.

In: Journal of Autoimmunity, Vol. 5, No. 3, 1992, p. 261-276.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wilson, Trevor J. ; Van de Water, Judith A ; Mohr, Frederick C ; Boyd, Richard L. ; Ansari, Aftab ; Wick, Georg ; Gershwin, M. Eric. / Avian scleroderma : Evidence for qualitative and quantitative T cell defects. In: Journal of Autoimmunity. 1992 ; Vol. 5, No. 3. pp. 261-276.
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