Attitudes and Social Norms Are Related to Attendance at Childhood Obesity Prevention Classes in a Rural Mexican-Heritage Community

Lucia L. Kaiser, Banafsheh Sadeghi, Iraklis E. Tseregounis, Rosa D. Manzo, Lisa Martinez, Maria I. Rangel, Rosa Gomez-Camacho, Sara Schaefer, Adela de la Torre

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To examine factors related to attendance of Mexican-heritage parents at community-based nutrition classes to prevent childhood obesity. Methods: Starting in 2011, interviewers collected baseline data from Niños Sanos Familia Sana (Healthy Children, Healthy Families) participants in rural California. Educators maintained attendance logs from 2012 to 2014. Informed by the Theory of Planned Behavior, interviewers administered an exit survey in 2015 to collect data on attitudes, subjective norms, health motivations, and perceived control related to attendance. Multivariable ordinal logistic regression analysis examined the correlates of attendance (n = 194, intervention group only). Results: Controlling for mother's age, marital status, acculturation, and employment, attitudes and subjective norms were significantly related to attendance (odds ratio = 1.27; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.18–1.37; P <.001). Conclusions and Implications: In these Mexican-heritage participants, attitudes and subjective norms were significant correlates of attendance. The Theory of Planned Behavior may shed light on attendance of high-risk groups but further testing of instruments is needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Nutrition Education and Behavior
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

Pediatric Obesity
Interviews
Acculturation
Diagnostic Self Evaluation
Marital Status
Motivation
Healthy Volunteers
Parents
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Regression Analysis
Mothers
Confidence Intervals
Social Norms

Keywords

  • attendance
  • childhood obesity prevention
  • Latino
  • nutrition education classes
  • parents

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Attitudes and Social Norms Are Related to Attendance at Childhood Obesity Prevention Classes in a Rural Mexican-Heritage Community. / Kaiser, Lucia L.; Sadeghi, Banafsheh; Tseregounis, Iraklis E.; Manzo, Rosa D.; Martinez, Lisa; Rangel, Maria I.; Gomez-Camacho, Rosa; Schaefer, Sara; de la Torre, Adela.

In: Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kaiser, Lucia L. ; Sadeghi, Banafsheh ; Tseregounis, Iraklis E. ; Manzo, Rosa D. ; Martinez, Lisa ; Rangel, Maria I. ; Gomez-Camacho, Rosa ; Schaefer, Sara ; de la Torre, Adela. / Attitudes and Social Norms Are Related to Attendance at Childhood Obesity Prevention Classes in a Rural Mexican-Heritage Community. In: Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior. 2018.
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