Attitudes and behavioral intentions regarding managed care

A comparison of academic and community physicians

Garrett E. Foulke, Robert A Bell, Allan D. Siefkin, Richard L Kravitz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Physicians' attitudes toward managed care and the impact of these attitudes on behaviors that affect patient care are important factors in managed care reform. In addition, the attitudes of academic physicians may influence their willingness to reform medical education in an effort to prepare students to practice under managed care. Although it is a conventional opinion that the academic health center and its academic physicians are antagonistic toward managed care, there has not been a direct comparison of the attitudes of these physicians to those of practicing community physicians. We used a self-administered questionnaire to assess attitudes toward managed care and behavioral intentions regarding practices related to managed care; a sample of academic physicians (n = 129) was compared with a sample of community physicians (n = 307). Community physicians were less negative in their evaluations of the quality of care in a managed care environment, but no differences were identified between the two groups with regard to the cost-effectiveness, inevitability, or need to adapt to managed care. Academic specialists were more likely than academic primary care physicians to rate managed care as something to which they needed to adapt. Community physicians were less likely to report a willingness to change their referral patterns. Aggregating across practice type, we also uncovered systematic differences between primary care and specialist physicians. The data suggest that opinions about quality and cost- containment in managed care are significant correlates of intentions to change practice behaviors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)555-563
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Managed Care
Volume4
Issue number4
StatePublished - Apr 1998
Externally publishedYes

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Managed Care Programs
managed care
physician
Physicians
community
Primary Care Physicians
Cost Control
Quality of Health Care
reform
cost containment
Medical Education
Cost-Benefit Analysis
patient care
Patient Care
Referral and Consultation
Students
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Medicine(all)
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Professions(all)

Cite this

Attitudes and behavioral intentions regarding managed care : A comparison of academic and community physicians. / Foulke, Garrett E.; Bell, Robert A; Siefkin, Allan D.; Kravitz, Richard L.

In: American Journal of Managed Care, Vol. 4, No. 4, 04.1998, p. 555-563.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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