Attentional Guidance and Match Decisions Rely on Different Template Information During Visual Search

Xinger Yu, Timothy D. Hanks, Joy J. Geng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

When searching for a target object, we engage in a continuous “look-identify” cycle in which we use known features of the target to guide attention toward potential targets and then to decide whether the selected object is indeed the target. Target information in memory (the target template or attentional template) is typically characterized as having a single, fixed source. However, debate has recently emerged over whether flexibility in the target template is relational or optimal. On the basis of evidence from two experiments using college students (Ns = 30 and 70, respectively), we propose that initial guidance of attention uses a coarse relational code, but subsequent decisions use an optimal code. Our results offer a novel perspective that the precision of template information differs when guiding sensory selection and when making identity decisions during visual search.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPsychological Science
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • attention
  • drift-diffusion model
  • open data
  • target template
  • visual search

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

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