Attention regulation by children with Down syndrome

Coordinated joint attention and social referencing looks

C. Kasari, S. Freeman, Peter Clive Mundy, M. D. Sigman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

87 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We examined attention regulation of children in two different situations designed to elicit triadic interactions (i.e., between self, other, and object). Thirty-five children with Down syndrome and 23 children with typical development were observed in a semi-structured adult-child interaction designed to elicit coordinated joint attention and an ambiguous situation in which a moving robot prompted an emotional response from the adults in order to elicit social referencing looks from the child. Children with Down syndrome engaged in significantly fewer social referencing looks. Group differences were not found for coordinated joint attention looks, suggesting that the difficulty for children with Down syndrome is in cognitive appraisal abilities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)128-136
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal on Mental Retardation
Volume100
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1995

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Down Syndrome
regulation
interaction
Joint Attention
robot
ability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Education
  • Health Professions(all)

Cite this

Attention regulation by children with Down syndrome : Coordinated joint attention and social referencing looks. / Kasari, C.; Freeman, S.; Mundy, Peter Clive; Sigman, M. D.

In: American Journal on Mental Retardation, Vol. 100, No. 2, 1995, p. 128-136.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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