Astrocytes get in the act in epilepsy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Neurons in the brain of individuals with focal epilepsy exhibit sustained discharges, called paroxysmal depolarization shifts. Unexpected new evidence indicates that glutamate release from glia can generate these events, and may serve to synchronize the activity of neurons.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)919-920
Number of pages2
JournalNature Medicine
Volume11
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Astrocytes
Neurons
Epilepsy
Partial Epilepsy
Depolarization
Neuroglia
Glutamic Acid
Brain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Astrocytes get in the act in epilepsy. / Rogawski, Michael A.

In: Nature Medicine, Vol. 11, No. 9, 09.2005, p. 919-920.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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