Associations of postbaccalaureate coursework with underrepresented race/ ethnicity, academic performance, and primary care training among matriculants at five California medical schools

Anthony Jerant, Tonya Fancher, Mark C. Henderson, Erin J. Griffin, Theodore R. Hall, Carolyn J. Kelly, Ellena M. Peterson, Peter Franks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Studies employing data collected over 15 years ago suggested salutary effects of postbaccalaureate (PB) premedical coursework on medical school class diversity, academic performance, and primary care training. The studies may have limited current applicability given changes in medical school admissions paradigms and population demographics. Using data from interviewees at >1 of 5 California public medical schools between 2011- 2013 (N=3805), we examined associations of PB premedical coursework with underrepresented race/ ethnicity; academic performance (United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 and Step 2 scores, clerkship Honors); and primary care residency. Adjusting for age, sex, and year, PB coursework was associated with underrepresented race/ ethnicity, but not after further adjustment for self- designated disadvantage (SDA). PB coursework was not associated with academic performance or primary care residency. Holistic consideration of SDA and UIM status in admissions coupled with robust matriculant support may merit exploration as an alternative to PB coursework for increasing medical school diversity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)971-986
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved
Volume32
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Associations of postbaccalaureate coursework with underrepresented race/ ethnicity, academic performance, and primary care training among matriculants at five California medical schools'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this