Associations between cannabis use and physical health problems in early midlife a longitudinal comparison of persistent cannabis vs tobacco users

Madeline H. Meier, Avshalom Caspi, Magdalena Cerda, Robert J. Hancox, Honalee Harrington, Renate Houts, Richie Poulton, Sandhya Ramrakha, W. Murray Thomson, Terrie E. Moffitt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

IMPORTANCE: After major policy changes in the United States, policymakers, health care professionals, and the general public seek information about whether recreational cannabis use is associated with physical health problems later in life. OBJECTIVE: To test associations between cannabis use over 20 years and a variety of physical health indexes at early midlife. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Participants belonged to a representative birth cohort of 1037 individuals born in Dunedin, New Zealand, in 1972 and 1973 and followed to age 38 years, with 95% retention (the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study). We tested whether cannabis use from ages 18 to 38 years was associated with physical health at age 38, even after controlling for tobacco use, childhood health, and childhood socioeconomic status. We also tested whether cannabis use from ages 26 to 38 years was associated with within-individual health decline using the same measures of health at both ages. EXPOSURES: We assessed frequency of cannabis use and cannabis dependence at ages 18, 21, 26, 32, and 38 years. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: We obtained laboratory measures of physical health (periodontal health, lung function, systemic inflammation, and metabolic health), as well as self-reported physical health, at ages 26 and 38 years. RESULTS: The 1037 study participants were 51.6% male (n = 535). Of these, 484 had ever used tobacco daily and 675 had ever used cannabis. Cannabis use was associated with poorer periodontal health at age 38 years and within-individual decline in periodontal health from ages 26 to 38 years. For example, cannabis joint-years from ages 18 to 38 years was associated with poorer periodontal health at age 38 years, even after controlling for tobacco pack-years (β = 0.12; 95% CI, 0.05-0.18; P <.001). Additionally, cannabis joint-years from ages 26 to 38 years was associated with poorer periodontal health at age 38 years, even after accountingfor periodontal health at age 26 years and tobacco pack-years (β = 0.10; 95% CI, 0.05-0.16; P <.001) However, cannabis use was unrelated to other physical health problems. Unlike cannabis use, tobacco use was associated with worse lung function, systemic inflammation, and metabolic health at age 38 years, as well as within-individual decline in health from ages 26 to 38 years. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Cannabis use for up to 20 years is associated with periodontal disease but is not associated with other physical health problems in early midlife.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)731-740
Number of pages10
JournalJAMA Psychiatry
Volume73
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2016

Fingerprint

Cannabis
Tobacco
Health
Tobacco Use
Joints
Marijuana Abuse
Inflammation
Lung
Periodontal Diseases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Associations between cannabis use and physical health problems in early midlife a longitudinal comparison of persistent cannabis vs tobacco users. / Meier, Madeline H.; Caspi, Avshalom; Cerda, Magdalena; Hancox, Robert J.; Harrington, Honalee; Houts, Renate; Poulton, Richie; Ramrakha, Sandhya; Thomson, W. Murray; Moffitt, Terrie E.

In: JAMA Psychiatry, Vol. 73, No. 7, 01.07.2016, p. 731-740.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Meier, MH, Caspi, A, Cerda, M, Hancox, RJ, Harrington, H, Houts, R, Poulton, R, Ramrakha, S, Thomson, WM & Moffitt, TE 2016, 'Associations between cannabis use and physical health problems in early midlife a longitudinal comparison of persistent cannabis vs tobacco users', JAMA Psychiatry, vol. 73, no. 7, pp. 731-740. https://doi.org/10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2016.0637
Meier, Madeline H. ; Caspi, Avshalom ; Cerda, Magdalena ; Hancox, Robert J. ; Harrington, Honalee ; Houts, Renate ; Poulton, Richie ; Ramrakha, Sandhya ; Thomson, W. Murray ; Moffitt, Terrie E. / Associations between cannabis use and physical health problems in early midlife a longitudinal comparison of persistent cannabis vs tobacco users. In: JAMA Psychiatry. 2016 ; Vol. 73, No. 7. pp. 731-740.
@article{c3398996c00945bdb36f45b6eef1ac12,
title = "Associations between cannabis use and physical health problems in early midlife a longitudinal comparison of persistent cannabis vs tobacco users",
abstract = "IMPORTANCE: After major policy changes in the United States, policymakers, health care professionals, and the general public seek information about whether recreational cannabis use is associated with physical health problems later in life. OBJECTIVE: To test associations between cannabis use over 20 years and a variety of physical health indexes at early midlife. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Participants belonged to a representative birth cohort of 1037 individuals born in Dunedin, New Zealand, in 1972 and 1973 and followed to age 38 years, with 95{\%} retention (the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study). We tested whether cannabis use from ages 18 to 38 years was associated with physical health at age 38, even after controlling for tobacco use, childhood health, and childhood socioeconomic status. We also tested whether cannabis use from ages 26 to 38 years was associated with within-individual health decline using the same measures of health at both ages. EXPOSURES: We assessed frequency of cannabis use and cannabis dependence at ages 18, 21, 26, 32, and 38 years. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: We obtained laboratory measures of physical health (periodontal health, lung function, systemic inflammation, and metabolic health), as well as self-reported physical health, at ages 26 and 38 years. RESULTS: The 1037 study participants were 51.6{\%} male (n = 535). Of these, 484 had ever used tobacco daily and 675 had ever used cannabis. Cannabis use was associated with poorer periodontal health at age 38 years and within-individual decline in periodontal health from ages 26 to 38 years. For example, cannabis joint-years from ages 18 to 38 years was associated with poorer periodontal health at age 38 years, even after controlling for tobacco pack-years (β = 0.12; 95{\%} CI, 0.05-0.18; P <.001). Additionally, cannabis joint-years from ages 26 to 38 years was associated with poorer periodontal health at age 38 years, even after accountingfor periodontal health at age 26 years and tobacco pack-years (β = 0.10; 95{\%} CI, 0.05-0.16; P <.001) However, cannabis use was unrelated to other physical health problems. Unlike cannabis use, tobacco use was associated with worse lung function, systemic inflammation, and metabolic health at age 38 years, as well as within-individual decline in health from ages 26 to 38 years. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Cannabis use for up to 20 years is associated with periodontal disease but is not associated with other physical health problems in early midlife.",
author = "Meier, {Madeline H.} and Avshalom Caspi and Magdalena Cerda and Hancox, {Robert J.} and Honalee Harrington and Renate Houts and Richie Poulton and Sandhya Ramrakha and Thomson, {W. Murray} and Moffitt, {Terrie E.}",
year = "2016",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2016.0637",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "73",
pages = "731--740",
journal = "JAMA Psychiatry",
issn = "2168-622X",
publisher = "American Medical Association",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Associations between cannabis use and physical health problems in early midlife a longitudinal comparison of persistent cannabis vs tobacco users

AU - Meier, Madeline H.

AU - Caspi, Avshalom

AU - Cerda, Magdalena

AU - Hancox, Robert J.

AU - Harrington, Honalee

AU - Houts, Renate

AU - Poulton, Richie

AU - Ramrakha, Sandhya

AU - Thomson, W. Murray

AU - Moffitt, Terrie E.

PY - 2016/7/1

Y1 - 2016/7/1

N2 - IMPORTANCE: After major policy changes in the United States, policymakers, health care professionals, and the general public seek information about whether recreational cannabis use is associated with physical health problems later in life. OBJECTIVE: To test associations between cannabis use over 20 years and a variety of physical health indexes at early midlife. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Participants belonged to a representative birth cohort of 1037 individuals born in Dunedin, New Zealand, in 1972 and 1973 and followed to age 38 years, with 95% retention (the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study). We tested whether cannabis use from ages 18 to 38 years was associated with physical health at age 38, even after controlling for tobacco use, childhood health, and childhood socioeconomic status. We also tested whether cannabis use from ages 26 to 38 years was associated with within-individual health decline using the same measures of health at both ages. EXPOSURES: We assessed frequency of cannabis use and cannabis dependence at ages 18, 21, 26, 32, and 38 years. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: We obtained laboratory measures of physical health (periodontal health, lung function, systemic inflammation, and metabolic health), as well as self-reported physical health, at ages 26 and 38 years. RESULTS: The 1037 study participants were 51.6% male (n = 535). Of these, 484 had ever used tobacco daily and 675 had ever used cannabis. Cannabis use was associated with poorer periodontal health at age 38 years and within-individual decline in periodontal health from ages 26 to 38 years. For example, cannabis joint-years from ages 18 to 38 years was associated with poorer periodontal health at age 38 years, even after controlling for tobacco pack-years (β = 0.12; 95% CI, 0.05-0.18; P <.001). Additionally, cannabis joint-years from ages 26 to 38 years was associated with poorer periodontal health at age 38 years, even after accountingfor periodontal health at age 26 years and tobacco pack-years (β = 0.10; 95% CI, 0.05-0.16; P <.001) However, cannabis use was unrelated to other physical health problems. Unlike cannabis use, tobacco use was associated with worse lung function, systemic inflammation, and metabolic health at age 38 years, as well as within-individual decline in health from ages 26 to 38 years. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Cannabis use for up to 20 years is associated with periodontal disease but is not associated with other physical health problems in early midlife.

AB - IMPORTANCE: After major policy changes in the United States, policymakers, health care professionals, and the general public seek information about whether recreational cannabis use is associated with physical health problems later in life. OBJECTIVE: To test associations between cannabis use over 20 years and a variety of physical health indexes at early midlife. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Participants belonged to a representative birth cohort of 1037 individuals born in Dunedin, New Zealand, in 1972 and 1973 and followed to age 38 years, with 95% retention (the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study). We tested whether cannabis use from ages 18 to 38 years was associated with physical health at age 38, even after controlling for tobacco use, childhood health, and childhood socioeconomic status. We also tested whether cannabis use from ages 26 to 38 years was associated with within-individual health decline using the same measures of health at both ages. EXPOSURES: We assessed frequency of cannabis use and cannabis dependence at ages 18, 21, 26, 32, and 38 years. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: We obtained laboratory measures of physical health (periodontal health, lung function, systemic inflammation, and metabolic health), as well as self-reported physical health, at ages 26 and 38 years. RESULTS: The 1037 study participants were 51.6% male (n = 535). Of these, 484 had ever used tobacco daily and 675 had ever used cannabis. Cannabis use was associated with poorer periodontal health at age 38 years and within-individual decline in periodontal health from ages 26 to 38 years. For example, cannabis joint-years from ages 18 to 38 years was associated with poorer periodontal health at age 38 years, even after controlling for tobacco pack-years (β = 0.12; 95% CI, 0.05-0.18; P <.001). Additionally, cannabis joint-years from ages 26 to 38 years was associated with poorer periodontal health at age 38 years, even after accountingfor periodontal health at age 26 years and tobacco pack-years (β = 0.10; 95% CI, 0.05-0.16; P <.001) However, cannabis use was unrelated to other physical health problems. Unlike cannabis use, tobacco use was associated with worse lung function, systemic inflammation, and metabolic health at age 38 years, as well as within-individual decline in health from ages 26 to 38 years. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Cannabis use for up to 20 years is associated with periodontal disease but is not associated with other physical health problems in early midlife.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84978173246&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84978173246&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2016.0637

DO - 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2016.0637

M3 - Article

VL - 73

SP - 731

EP - 740

JO - JAMA Psychiatry

JF - JAMA Psychiatry

SN - 2168-622X

IS - 7

ER -