Association of Social Relationships With Depressive Symptoms: Testing an Alternative to Social Support

Peter Franks, Cleveland Shields, Thomas Campbell, Susan McDaniel, Jeffrey Harp, Richard J. Botelho

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

Low social support and expressed emotion have been associated with depression, but no studies examined their relative contributions. A self-report questionnaire was developed to measure family emotional involvement and perceived criticism to assess the main components of family expressed emotion. Eighty-three family practice patients older than 40 years responded to a survey assessing depressive symptoms, social support, life events, and expressed emotion. Perceived criticism, intense emotional involvement, and negative life events were all independently associated with depressive symptoms. After controlling for expressed emotion, the association of low social support with depressive symptoms was no longer statistically significant. The results support the primacy of family interactions (with high perceived criticism and emotional involvement) over low social support in explaining the association between social relationships and depression.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)49-59
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Family Psychology
Volume6
Issue number1
StatePublished - Sep 1992
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Association of Social Relationships With Depressive Symptoms: Testing an Alternative to Social Support'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Franks, P., Shields, C., Campbell, T., McDaniel, S., Harp, J., & Botelho, R. J. (1992). Association of Social Relationships With Depressive Symptoms: Testing an Alternative to Social Support. Journal of Family Psychology, 6(1), 49-59.