Association of Self-reported Physical Activity With Laboratory Markers of Nutrition and Inflammation: The Comprehensive Dialysis Study

Shuchi Anand, Glenn M. Chertow, Kirsten L. Johansen, Barbara Grimes, Manjula Kurella Tamura, Lorien Dalrymple, George Kaysen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: Patients on dialysis maintain extremely low levels of physical activity. Prior studies have demonstrated a direct correlation between nutrition and physical activity but provide conflicting data on the link between inflammation and physical activity. Using a cohort of patients new to dialysis from the Comprehensive Dialysis Study (CDS), we examined associations of self-reported physical activity with laboratory markers of nutrition and inflammation. Design, Setting, and Patients: Between June 2005 and June 2007, CDS collected data on self-reported physical activity, nutrition, and health-related quality of life from patients starting dialysis in 296 facilities located throughout the United States. Baseline serum samples were collected from participants in a nutrition sub-study of CDS. Measures: Serum albumin and prealbumin were measured as markers of nutrition, and C-reactive protein (CRP) and α-1-acid glycoprotein as markers of inflammation. Self-reported physical activity was characterized by the maximum activity score (MAS) and adjusted activity score (AAS) of the Human Activity Profile. Results: The mean age of participants in the analytic cohort (n = 201) was 61 years. The MAS and AAS were below the 10th and first percentile, respectively, in comparison with healthy 60 year-old norms. Both activity scores were directly correlated with albumin (r 2 = 0.3, P < .0001) and prealbumin (r 2 = 0.3, P < .0001), and inversely correlated with CRP (AAS: r 2 = -0.2, P = .01; MAS: r 2 = -0.1, P = .08). In multivariate analyses adjusting for age, gender, race/ethnicity, diabetes status, and center, both activity scores were directly correlated with prealbumin and inversely correlated with CRP. Conclusions: Patients new to dialysis with laboratory-based evidence of malnutrition and/or inflammation are likely to report lower levels of physical activity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)429-437
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Renal Nutrition
Volume21
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2011

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Nephrology

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