Association between psoriasis and viral infections in the United States

Focusing on hepatitis B, hepatitis C and human immunodeficiency virus

K. N. Kanada, C. W. Schupp, A. W. Armstrong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background No published data in the U.S. population regarding an association between viral infections and psoriasis are currently available. Assessment of infection and immunosuppression risk is critical in managing psoriasis patients. Objectives To examine the association between psoriasis and viral infections including hepatitis B, hepatitis C and human immunodeficiency viral infections in the general U.S. population. Methods Population data representative of the U.S. cohort were analysed from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 2003-2006. Hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and human immunodeficiency antibodies status were ascertained from laboratory evaluations. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to assess the associations between psoriasis and these viral infections. Results Among 6532 participants aged 20-59 years who provided responses to their psoriasis status, 162 patients reported having psoriasis. Based on multivariate regression analyses, psoriasis was not significantly associated with positive serology for hepatitis B core [odds ratio (OR), 0.83; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.32-2.17; P = 0.7060], hepatitis B surface [OR, 7.89; CI, 0.52-119; P = 0.1355], hepatitis C [OR, 0.24; CI, 0.03-2.01; P = 0.1915], or human immunodeficiency virus [OR, 0.73; CI, 0.09-5.93; P = 0.7646] antibodies, after adjusting for age, gender, race and smoking status. Conclusions From the limited sample of the NHANES database on psoriasis and viral infections, psoriasis does not appear to be associated with an increased risk of hepatitis B, hepatitis C, or HIV infection in the U.S. population. Epidemiology of these viral infections in psoriasis needs to be continually studied and updated given their importance in management considerations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1312-1316
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology
Volume27
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2013

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Virus Diseases
Hepatitis C
Hepatitis B
Psoriasis
HIV
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Nutrition Surveys
Population
Multivariate Analysis
Antibodies
Serology
Immunosuppression
HIV Infections
Epidemiology
Smoking
Regression Analysis
Databases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Association between psoriasis and viral infections in the United States : Focusing on hepatitis B, hepatitis C and human immunodeficiency virus. / Kanada, K. N.; Schupp, C. W.; Armstrong, A. W.

In: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, Vol. 27, No. 10, 10.2013, p. 1312-1316.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background No published data in the U.S. population regarding an association between viral infections and psoriasis are currently available. Assessment of infection and immunosuppression risk is critical in managing psoriasis patients. Objectives To examine the association between psoriasis and viral infections including hepatitis B, hepatitis C and human immunodeficiency viral infections in the general U.S. population. Methods Population data representative of the U.S. cohort were analysed from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 2003-2006. Hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and human immunodeficiency antibodies status were ascertained from laboratory evaluations. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to assess the associations between psoriasis and these viral infections. Results Among 6532 participants aged 20-59 years who provided responses to their psoriasis status, 162 patients reported having psoriasis. Based on multivariate regression analyses, psoriasis was not significantly associated with positive serology for hepatitis B core [odds ratio (OR), 0.83; 95{\%} confidence interval (CI), 0.32-2.17; P = 0.7060], hepatitis B surface [OR, 7.89; CI, 0.52-119; P = 0.1355], hepatitis C [OR, 0.24; CI, 0.03-2.01; P = 0.1915], or human immunodeficiency virus [OR, 0.73; CI, 0.09-5.93; P = 0.7646] antibodies, after adjusting for age, gender, race and smoking status. Conclusions From the limited sample of the NHANES database on psoriasis and viral infections, psoriasis does not appear to be associated with an increased risk of hepatitis B, hepatitis C, or HIV infection in the U.S. population. Epidemiology of these viral infections in psoriasis needs to be continually studied and updated given their importance in management considerations.",
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