Assessment of tear film osmolarity using the TearLab osmometer in normal dogs and dogs with keratoconjunctivitis sicca

Lionel Sebbag, Shin Ae Park, Philip H Kass, David J Maggs, Mayssa Attar, Christopher J Murphy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate repeatability and reproducibility of tear osmolarity measured using the TearLab osmometer in normal dogs and to assess its diagnostic potential in dogs with keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS). Animals studied: Beagle dogs; six normal and five with KCS. Procedures: Tear osmolarity and Schirmer tear test-1 (STT-1) values were obtained at various times. Normal dogs were assessed for diurnal variation and repeatability and reproducibility of measurements. Dogs with KCS were evaluated before and after 5 months' topical twice-daily therapy with 2% cyclosporine. Results: Mean ± SD tear osmolarity (mOsm/L) was significantly higher in normal dogs (337.4 ± 16.2) than in dogs with KCS before therapy (306.2 ± 18.0; P < 0.0001), but not following therapy with 2% cyclosporine (330.5 ± 13.7; P = 1.00). Osmolarity readings lower than 325.5 mOsm/L were suggestive of KCS (84.8% sensitivity and 87.1% specificity). In normal dogs, tear osmolarity readings were stable during the daytime (P = 0.99). Repeated measurements revealed high variability and typically poor-to-moderate repeatability and reproducibility, although this was improved by taking three successive measurements at each session. Considering combined data from all dogs, a positive correlation existed between STT-1 and tear osmolarity measurements (Pearson's correlation test, P = 0.04, r = 0.62). Conclusions: Canine tear osmolarity as determined by TearLab osmometer was variable, required multiple readings to be informative, and differed from values reported for humans. Dogs with KCS had a lower tear osmolarity than did normal dogs, and this increased following cyclosporine therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalVeterinary Ophthalmology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2016

Fingerprint

Keratoconjunctivitis Sicca
keratoconjunctivitis
osmolarity
Tears
Osmolar Concentration
Dogs
dogs
cyclosporine
Cyclosporine
reproducibility
Reading
repeatability
therapeutics
Therapeutics
testing
Beagle
diurnal variation
Canidae

Keywords

  • Diagnostic tool
  • Dog
  • Keratoconjunctivitis sicca
  • Osmolarity
  • Tear film
  • TearLab

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

@article{09918d149aea4ca8918b0d2b4b2d484d,
title = "Assessment of tear film osmolarity using the TearLab™ osmometer in normal dogs and dogs with keratoconjunctivitis sicca",
abstract = "Objective: To evaluate repeatability and reproducibility of tear osmolarity measured using the TearLab™ osmometer in normal dogs and to assess its diagnostic potential in dogs with keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS). Animals studied: Beagle dogs; six normal and five with KCS. Procedures: Tear osmolarity and Schirmer tear test-1 (STT-1) values were obtained at various times. Normal dogs were assessed for diurnal variation and repeatability and reproducibility of measurements. Dogs with KCS were evaluated before and after 5 months' topical twice-daily therapy with 2{\%} cyclosporine. Results: Mean ± SD tear osmolarity (mOsm/L) was significantly higher in normal dogs (337.4 ± 16.2) than in dogs with KCS before therapy (306.2 ± 18.0; P < 0.0001), but not following therapy with 2{\%} cyclosporine (330.5 ± 13.7; P = 1.00). Osmolarity readings lower than 325.5 mOsm/L were suggestive of KCS (84.8{\%} sensitivity and 87.1{\%} specificity). In normal dogs, tear osmolarity readings were stable during the daytime (P = 0.99). Repeated measurements revealed high variability and typically poor-to-moderate repeatability and reproducibility, although this was improved by taking three successive measurements at each session. Considering combined data from all dogs, a positive correlation existed between STT-1 and tear osmolarity measurements (Pearson's correlation test, P = 0.04, r = 0.62). Conclusions: Canine tear osmolarity as determined by TearLab™ osmometer was variable, required multiple readings to be informative, and differed from values reported for humans. Dogs with KCS had a lower tear osmolarity than did normal dogs, and this increased following cyclosporine therapy.",
keywords = "Diagnostic tool, Dog, Keratoconjunctivitis sicca, Osmolarity, Tear film, TearLab",
author = "Lionel Sebbag and Park, {Shin Ae} and Kass, {Philip H} and Maggs, {David J} and Mayssa Attar and Murphy, {Christopher J}",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.1111/vop.12436",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Veterinary Ophthalmology",
issn = "1463-5216",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Assessment of tear film osmolarity using the TearLab™ osmometer in normal dogs and dogs with keratoconjunctivitis sicca

AU - Sebbag, Lionel

AU - Park, Shin Ae

AU - Kass, Philip H

AU - Maggs, David J

AU - Attar, Mayssa

AU - Murphy, Christopher J

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - Objective: To evaluate repeatability and reproducibility of tear osmolarity measured using the TearLab™ osmometer in normal dogs and to assess its diagnostic potential in dogs with keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS). Animals studied: Beagle dogs; six normal and five with KCS. Procedures: Tear osmolarity and Schirmer tear test-1 (STT-1) values were obtained at various times. Normal dogs were assessed for diurnal variation and repeatability and reproducibility of measurements. Dogs with KCS were evaluated before and after 5 months' topical twice-daily therapy with 2% cyclosporine. Results: Mean ± SD tear osmolarity (mOsm/L) was significantly higher in normal dogs (337.4 ± 16.2) than in dogs with KCS before therapy (306.2 ± 18.0; P < 0.0001), but not following therapy with 2% cyclosporine (330.5 ± 13.7; P = 1.00). Osmolarity readings lower than 325.5 mOsm/L were suggestive of KCS (84.8% sensitivity and 87.1% specificity). In normal dogs, tear osmolarity readings were stable during the daytime (P = 0.99). Repeated measurements revealed high variability and typically poor-to-moderate repeatability and reproducibility, although this was improved by taking three successive measurements at each session. Considering combined data from all dogs, a positive correlation existed between STT-1 and tear osmolarity measurements (Pearson's correlation test, P = 0.04, r = 0.62). Conclusions: Canine tear osmolarity as determined by TearLab™ osmometer was variable, required multiple readings to be informative, and differed from values reported for humans. Dogs with KCS had a lower tear osmolarity than did normal dogs, and this increased following cyclosporine therapy.

AB - Objective: To evaluate repeatability and reproducibility of tear osmolarity measured using the TearLab™ osmometer in normal dogs and to assess its diagnostic potential in dogs with keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS). Animals studied: Beagle dogs; six normal and five with KCS. Procedures: Tear osmolarity and Schirmer tear test-1 (STT-1) values were obtained at various times. Normal dogs were assessed for diurnal variation and repeatability and reproducibility of measurements. Dogs with KCS were evaluated before and after 5 months' topical twice-daily therapy with 2% cyclosporine. Results: Mean ± SD tear osmolarity (mOsm/L) was significantly higher in normal dogs (337.4 ± 16.2) than in dogs with KCS before therapy (306.2 ± 18.0; P < 0.0001), but not following therapy with 2% cyclosporine (330.5 ± 13.7; P = 1.00). Osmolarity readings lower than 325.5 mOsm/L were suggestive of KCS (84.8% sensitivity and 87.1% specificity). In normal dogs, tear osmolarity readings were stable during the daytime (P = 0.99). Repeated measurements revealed high variability and typically poor-to-moderate repeatability and reproducibility, although this was improved by taking three successive measurements at each session. Considering combined data from all dogs, a positive correlation existed between STT-1 and tear osmolarity measurements (Pearson's correlation test, P = 0.04, r = 0.62). Conclusions: Canine tear osmolarity as determined by TearLab™ osmometer was variable, required multiple readings to be informative, and differed from values reported for humans. Dogs with KCS had a lower tear osmolarity than did normal dogs, and this increased following cyclosporine therapy.

KW - Diagnostic tool

KW - Dog

KW - Keratoconjunctivitis sicca

KW - Osmolarity

KW - Tear film

KW - TearLab

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U2 - 10.1111/vop.12436

DO - 10.1111/vop.12436

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C2 - 27761982

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JO - Veterinary Ophthalmology

JF - Veterinary Ophthalmology

SN - 1463-5216

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