Assessment of hearing in persons with learning disabilities: The Phoenix NHS Trust, January 1997 to September 1998

W. K. Smith, R. Mair, L. Marshall, S. Bilous, M. A. Birchall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

People with learning disabilities are at increased risk of impaired hearing. The aims of this study were to assess the prevalence of hearing impairment and ear disease in people attending the specialist Otolaryngology/Hearing Therapy clinic at the Phoenix NHS Trust, Bristol. The present and future process of such a service was explored. Data were obtained from the referral form and notes made by the consultant otolaryngologist. In 20 months, there were 226 consultations, 188 of which were new referrals. The majority of patients had verbal communication to some extent. Suspected infection/inflammation and unobtainable/abnormal tympanograms, each accounted for 43 per cent of reasons for referral. Twenty per cent of patients were normal otologically. Eighteen per cent were provided with hearing aids and nine per cent required surgery. Ten patients underwent brainstem evoked response testing, half of whom had aidable hearing. Our results are comparable to published data of similar units. It is recommended that combined otolaryngology/specialist hearing therapy services are continued and further developed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)940-943
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Laryngology and Otology
Volume114
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Learning Disorders
Disabled Persons
Hearing
Referral and Consultation
Otolaryngology
Ear Diseases
Hearing Aids
Consultants
Hearing Loss
Brain Stem
Communication
Inflammation
Therapeutics
Infection

Keywords

  • Hearing Impaired Persons
  • Learning Disorders

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Assessment of hearing in persons with learning disabilities : The Phoenix NHS Trust, January 1997 to September 1998. / Smith, W. K.; Mair, R.; Marshall, L.; Bilous, S.; Birchall, M. A.

In: Journal of Laryngology and Otology, Vol. 114, No. 12, 2000, p. 940-943.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Smith, W. K. ; Mair, R. ; Marshall, L. ; Bilous, S. ; Birchall, M. A. / Assessment of hearing in persons with learning disabilities : The Phoenix NHS Trust, January 1997 to September 1998. In: Journal of Laryngology and Otology. 2000 ; Vol. 114, No. 12. pp. 940-943.
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