Assessing resident's knowledge and communication skills using four different evaluation tools

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: This study assesses the relationship between 4 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) outcome project measures for interpersonal and communication skills and medical knowledge; specifically, monthly performance evaluations, objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs), the American Board of Family Practice in-training examination (ABFP-ITE) and the Davis observation code (DOC) practice style profiles. Methods: Based on previous work, we have DOC scoring for 29 residents from the University of California, Davis Department of Family and Community Medicine. For all these residents we also had the results of monthly performance evaluations, 2 required OSCE exercises, and the results of 3 American Board of Family Medicine (ABFM) ITEs. Data for each of these measures were abstracted for each resident. The Pearson correlation coefficient was used to assess the presence or lack of correlation between each of these evaluation methods. Results: There is little correlation between various evaluation methods used to assess medical knowledge, and there is also little correlation between various evaluation methods used to assess communication skills. Conclusion: The outcome project remains a 'work in progress', with the need for larger studies to assess the value of different assessment measures of resident competence. It is unlikely that DOC will become a useful evaluation tool.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)630-636
Number of pages7
JournalMedical Education
Volume40
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2006

Fingerprint

communication skills
Communication
resident
evaluation
Observation
examination
medicine
Community Medicine
Graduate Medical Education
Family Practice
Accreditation
accreditation
Mental Competency
performance
graduate
Medicine
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
lack
community
Values

Keywords

  • *communication
  • Clinical competence/*standards
  • Internship and residency/*standards
  • Physician-patient relations
  • United States

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Education
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Assessing resident's knowledge and communication skills using four different evaluation tools. / Nuovo, James; Bertakis, Klea D; Azari, Rahman.

In: Medical Education, Vol. 40, No. 7, 07.2006, p. 630-636.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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