Assessing point-of-care device specifications and needs for pathogen detection in emergencies and disasters

Gerald J Kost, Daniel M. Mecozzi, T. Keith Brock, Corbin M. Curtis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: We assessed point-of-care device specifications and needs for pathogen detection in urgent care, emergencies, and disasters. Methods: We surveyed American Association for Clinical Chemistry members and compared responses to those of disaster experts. Online SurveyMonkey questions covered performance characteristics, device design, pathogen targets, and other specifications. Results: For disasters, respondents preferred direct sample collection with a disposable test cassette that stores biohazardous material (P < 0.001). They identified methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhi, Vibrio cholerae, Escherichia coli, S. aureus, and Streptococcus pneumoniae as high-priority pathogens. First responders were deemed the professional group who should perform point-of-care testing in disasters (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Needs assessment is now a requisite for competitive funding, so the results in this report will be useful to investigators preparing grant applications. Point-of-care devices used in disasters should address the needs of first responders who give high priority to contamination-free whole-blood sampling, superior performance pathogen detection, and human immunodeficiency virus types 1/2 blood donor screening. There was surprising concordance of preferences among different professional groups, which presages formulation of global consensus guidelines to assist high-impact preparedness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)119-125
Number of pages7
JournalPoint of Care
Volume11
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2012

Keywords

  • Device design
  • direct sample collection
  • first responders
  • pathogen detection
  • test cluster

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

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