Assessing 3rd year medical students' interprofessional collaborative practice behaviors during a standardized patient encounter: A multi-institutional, cross-sectional study

Sandra K. Oza, Christy K. Boscardin, Maria Wamsley, Aimee Sznewajs, Win May, Andrew Nevins, Malathi Srinivasan, Karen E. Hauer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: To understand how third-year medical student interprofessional collaborative practice (IPCP) is affected by self-efficacy and interprofessional experiences (extracurricular experiences and formal curricula). Methods: The authors measured learner IPCP using an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) with a standardized nurse (SN) and standardized patient (SP) during a statewide clinical performance examination. At four California medical schools from April to August 2012, SPs and SNs rated learner IPCP (10 items, range 0-100) and patient-centered communication (10 items, range 0-100). Post-OSCE, students reported their interprofessional self-efficacy (16 items, 2 factors, range 1-10) and prior extracurricular interprofessional experiences (3 items). School representatives shared their interprofessional curricula during guided interviews. Results: Four hundred sixty-four of 530 eligible medical students (88%) participated. Mean IPCP performance was 79.6 ± 14.1 and mean self-efficacy scores were 7.9 (interprofessional teamwork) and 7.1 (interprofessional feedback and evaluation). Seventy percent of students reported prior extracurricular interprofessional experiences; all schools offered formal interprofessional curricula. IPCP was associated with self-efficacy for interprofessional teamwork (β = 1.6, 95% CI [0.1, 3.1], p=0.04) and patient-centered communication (β = 12.5, 95% CI [2.7, 22.3], p = 0.01). Conclusions: Medical student IPCP performance was associated with self-efficacy for interprofessional teamwork and patient-centered communication. Increasing interprofessional opportunities that influence medical students' self-efficacy may increase engagement in IPCP.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)915-925
Number of pages11
JournalMedical Teacher
Volume37
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

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Self Efficacy
Medical Students
cross-sectional study
medical student
Cross-Sectional Studies
self-efficacy
Curriculum
teamwork
Communication
curriculum
examination
communication
experience
Students
school
performance
Medical Schools
Nurses
Interviews
nurse

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Education

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Assessing 3rd year medical students' interprofessional collaborative practice behaviors during a standardized patient encounter : A multi-institutional, cross-sectional study. / Oza, Sandra K.; Boscardin, Christy K.; Wamsley, Maria; Sznewajs, Aimee; May, Win; Nevins, Andrew; Srinivasan, Malathi; Hauer, Karen E.

In: Medical Teacher, Vol. 37, No. 10, 01.01.2015, p. 915-925.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Oza, Sandra K. ; Boscardin, Christy K. ; Wamsley, Maria ; Sznewajs, Aimee ; May, Win ; Nevins, Andrew ; Srinivasan, Malathi ; Hauer, Karen E. / Assessing 3rd year medical students' interprofessional collaborative practice behaviors during a standardized patient encounter : A multi-institutional, cross-sectional study. In: Medical Teacher. 2015 ; Vol. 37, No. 10. pp. 915-925.
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abstract = "Background: To understand how third-year medical student interprofessional collaborative practice (IPCP) is affected by self-efficacy and interprofessional experiences (extracurricular experiences and formal curricula). Methods: The authors measured learner IPCP using an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) with a standardized nurse (SN) and standardized patient (SP) during a statewide clinical performance examination. At four California medical schools from April to August 2012, SPs and SNs rated learner IPCP (10 items, range 0-100) and patient-centered communication (10 items, range 0-100). Post-OSCE, students reported their interprofessional self-efficacy (16 items, 2 factors, range 1-10) and prior extracurricular interprofessional experiences (3 items). School representatives shared their interprofessional curricula during guided interviews. Results: Four hundred sixty-four of 530 eligible medical students (88{\%}) participated. Mean IPCP performance was 79.6 ± 14.1 and mean self-efficacy scores were 7.9 (interprofessional teamwork) and 7.1 (interprofessional feedback and evaluation). Seventy percent of students reported prior extracurricular interprofessional experiences; all schools offered formal interprofessional curricula. IPCP was associated with self-efficacy for interprofessional teamwork (β = 1.6, 95{\%} CI [0.1, 3.1], p=0.04) and patient-centered communication (β = 12.5, 95{\%} CI [2.7, 22.3], p = 0.01). Conclusions: Medical student IPCP performance was associated with self-efficacy for interprofessional teamwork and patient-centered communication. Increasing interprofessional opportunities that influence medical students' self-efficacy may increase engagement in IPCP.",
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