Arterial fluorescent components involved in atherosclerotic plaque instability: Differentiation by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

Laura Marcu, W. S. Grundfest, J. M I Maarek

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

As part of our ongoing research on spectroscopic differentiation between unstable and stable atherosclerotic lesions, we report data on time-resolved fluorescence of components of arterial intima matrix (different types of cholesterols, lipoproteins, and collagens). Certain compositional features of atherosclerotic plaque have been associated with plaque instability and rupture. We have characterized and compared the time-resolved spectra of structural proteins (Types I and III collagens, and elastin), lipoproteins (LDL, VLDL), and cholesterols (free cholesterol, and cholesteryl oleate and linoleate) induced with nitrogen laser excitation pulses (337 nm, 3 ns) and detected (360-510 nm range, 5 nm interval) with a MCP-PMT connected to a fast digitizer (2 Gsamples/s). Spectral intensities and time-dependent parameters (lifetime τ2 f; decay constants: τ 1 (fast-term), τ 2 (slow-term), A 1 (fast-term amplitude contribution)) derived from the time-resolved spectra were used for samples characterization and comparison. We observed that time-resolved data distinguish collagens from cholesterols and from lipoproteins, and additionally, distinguish different types of cholesterols, different types of lipoproteins and different types of collagen from each other. For instance, the collagen lifetime (390 nm: Type I 5.2 ns, Type III 2.95 ns) was significantly longer than that of cholesterols (free 1.5 ns, linoleate 0.9 ns, oleate 1.0 ns) and that of lipoproteins (LDL 0.95 ns, VLDL 0.85 ns). Our results suggest that both the accumulation of lipids (short-lived components) and breakdown of collagens (long-lived) would result on faster emission for more unstable plaques when compared to more stable plaques. Our findings suggest that time-resolved spectroscopy can be used to monitor compositional changes that take place in arterial intima during the transformation of a stable plaque into an unstable one.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
EditorsR.R. Anderson, K.E. Bartels, L.S. Bass, C.G. Garrett
Pages428-433
Number of pages6
Volume4244
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001
EventLaser in Surgery: Advanced Characterization, Therapeutics, and Systems XI - San Jose,CA, United States
Duration: Jun 20 2001Jun 23 2001

Other

OtherLaser in Surgery: Advanced Characterization, Therapeutics, and Systems XI
CountryUnited States
CitySan Jose,CA
Period6/20/016/23/01

Fingerprint

lipoproteins
Cholesterol
cholesterol
Fluorescence spectroscopy
Lipoproteins
collagens
Collagen
fluorescence
spectroscopy
elastin
Elastin
nitrogen lasers
life (durability)
Laser excitation
analog to digital converters
lesions
Lipids
lipids
Laser pulses
breakdown

Keywords

  • Collagen types
  • Fluorescence impulse response function
  • Noninvasive tissue characterization
  • Time-resolved laser induced fluorescence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Marcu, L., Grundfest, W. S., & Maarek, J. M. I. (2001). Arterial fluorescent components involved in atherosclerotic plaque instability: Differentiation by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. In R. R. Anderson, K. E. Bartels, L. S. Bass, & C. G. Garrett (Eds.), Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering (Vol. 4244, pp. 428-433) https://doi.org/10.1117/12.427829

Arterial fluorescent components involved in atherosclerotic plaque instability : Differentiation by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. / Marcu, Laura; Grundfest, W. S.; Maarek, J. M I.

Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. ed. / R.R. Anderson; K.E. Bartels; L.S. Bass; C.G. Garrett. Vol. 4244 2001. p. 428-433.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Marcu, L, Grundfest, WS & Maarek, JMI 2001, Arterial fluorescent components involved in atherosclerotic plaque instability: Differentiation by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. in RR Anderson, KE Bartels, LS Bass & CG Garrett (eds), Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. vol. 4244, pp. 428-433, Laser in Surgery: Advanced Characterization, Therapeutics, and Systems XI, San Jose,CA, United States, 6/20/01. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.427829
Marcu L, Grundfest WS, Maarek JMI. Arterial fluorescent components involved in atherosclerotic plaque instability: Differentiation by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. In Anderson RR, Bartels KE, Bass LS, Garrett CG, editors, Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 4244. 2001. p. 428-433 https://doi.org/10.1117/12.427829
Marcu, Laura ; Grundfest, W. S. ; Maarek, J. M I. / Arterial fluorescent components involved in atherosclerotic plaque instability : Differentiation by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. editor / R.R. Anderson ; K.E. Bartels ; L.S. Bass ; C.G. Garrett. Vol. 4244 2001. pp. 428-433
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