Are we ready for the CARE Act?

Family caregiving education for health care providers

Lisa M. Badovinac, Lori Nicolaysen, Theresa A Harvath

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The CARE Act, law in 40 states and territories in the United States, requires hospitals to identify and include family caregivers during admission and in preparation for discharge. Although the number of family caregivers has been steadily increasing, health care providers are ill-prepared to address their needs, and caregiving remains a neglected topic in health care providers' education. A market analysis was performed to explore the availability of and interest in interprofessional courses and programs focused on preparing health professionals to support family caregivers. Although nurses and chief nursing officers agreed on the importance of supporting caregivers, they were less likely to endorse formal educational preparation for this complex role. The current study elucidates a gap between what caregivers report they need and the preparation of health care professionals to advance family-centered approaches to care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)7-11
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Gerontological Nursing
Volume45
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2019

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Health Personnel
Caregivers
Education
State Hospitals
Nursing
Nurses
Delivery of Health Care
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Gerontology

Cite this

Are we ready for the CARE Act? Family caregiving education for health care providers. / Badovinac, Lisa M.; Nicolaysen, Lori; Harvath, Theresa A.

In: Journal of Gerontological Nursing, Vol. 45, No. 3, 01.03.2019, p. 7-11.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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