Are there emotion perception deficits in young autistic children?

Sally J Ozonoff, B. F. Pennington, Sally J Rogers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

239 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Two studies were conducted to test the hypothesis that young autistic children are selectively impaired on emotion perception tasks. Results supporting the hypothesis were found on two of the four measures when the controls used were matched on nonverbal mental age; performance on the other tasks was consistent with global deficits across affective and non-affective domains, rather than specific deficits in emotion perception. When the autistic group was compared with controls matched on verbal mental age, no group differences were found. These results suggest that emotion perception impairment is not likely to be the primary underlying deficit in autism. Additional areas for further investigation were suggested.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)343-361
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines
Volume31
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1990
Externally publishedYes

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Emotions
Autistic Disorder
Age Groups

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Are there emotion perception deficits in young autistic children? / Ozonoff, Sally J; Pennington, B. F.; Rogers, Sally J.

In: Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines, Vol. 31, No. 3, 1990, p. 343-361.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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