Are impairments of action monitoring and executive control true dissociative dysfunctions in patients with schizophrenia?

And U. Turken, Patrik Vuilleumier, Daniel H. Mathalon, Diane Swick, Judith M. Ford

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

56 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Impaired self-monitoring is considered a critical deficit of schizophrenia. The authors asked whether this is a specific and isolable impairment or is part of a global disturbance of cognitive and attentional functions. Method: Internal monitoring of erroneous actions, as well as three components of attentional control (conflict resolution, set switching, and preparatory attention) were assessed during performance of a single task by eight high-functioning patients with schizophrenia and eight comparison subjects. Results: The patients exhibited no significant dysfunction of attentional control during task performance. In contrast, their ability to correct errors without external feedback and, by inference, to self-monitor their actions was markedly compromised. Conclusions: This finding suggests that dysfunction of self-monitoring in schizophrenia does not necessarily reflect a general decline in cognitive function but is evidence of disproportionately pronounced impairment of action monitoring, which may be mediated by a distinct subsystem within the brain's executive attention networks.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1881-1883
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of Psychiatry
Volume160
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2003

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Executive Function
Schizophrenia
Cognition
Aptitude
Negotiating
Task Performance and Analysis
Brain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Are impairments of action monitoring and executive control true dissociative dysfunctions in patients with schizophrenia? / Turken, And U.; Vuilleumier, Patrik; Mathalon, Daniel H.; Swick, Diane; Ford, Judith M.

In: American Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 160, No. 10, 10.2003, p. 1881-1883.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Turken, And U. ; Vuilleumier, Patrik ; Mathalon, Daniel H. ; Swick, Diane ; Ford, Judith M. / Are impairments of action monitoring and executive control true dissociative dysfunctions in patients with schizophrenia?. In: American Journal of Psychiatry. 2003 ; Vol. 160, No. 10. pp. 1881-1883.
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