Architecture of ribonucleoprotein complexes in influenza A virus particles

Takeshi Noda, Hiroshi Sagara, Albert Yen, Ayato Takada, Hiroshi Kida, R. Holland Cheng, Yoshihiro Kawaoka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

265 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In viruses, as in eukaryotes, elaborate mechanisms have evolved to protect the genome and to ensure its timely replication and reliable transmission to progeny. Influenza A viruses are enveloped, spherical or filamentous structures, ranging from 80 to 120 nm in diameter1. Inside each envelope is a viral genome consisting of eight single-stranded negative-sense RNA segments of 890 to 2,341 nucleotides each1. These segments are associated with nucleoprotein and three polymerase subunits, designated PA, PB1 and PB2; the resultant ribonucleoprotein complexes (RNPs) resemble a twisted rod (10-15 nm in width and 30-120 nm in length) that is folded back and coiled on itself 2-4. Late in viral infection, newly synthesized RNPs are transported from the nucleus to the plasma membrane, where they are incorporated into progeny virions capable of infecting other cells. Here we show, by transmission electron microscopy of serially sectioned virions, that the RNPs of influenza A virus are organized in a distinct pattern (seven segments of different lengths surrounding a central segment). The individual RNPs are suspended from the interior of the viral envelope at the distal end of the budding virion and are oriented perpendicular to the budding tip. This finding argues against random incorporation of RNPs into virions5, supporting instead a model in which each segment contains specific incorporation signals that enable the RNPs to be recruited and packaged as a complete set6-12. A selective mechanism of RNP incorporation into virions and the unique organization of the eight RNP segments may be crucial to maintaining the integrity of the viral genome during repeated cycles of replication.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)490-492
Number of pages3
JournalNature
Volume439
Issue number7075
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 26 2006

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Ribonucleoproteins
Influenza A virus
Virion
Viral Genome
Nucleoproteins
Virus Diseases
Eukaryota
Transmission Electron Microscopy
Nucleotides
Cell Membrane
Genome
RNA
Viruses

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Noda, T., Sagara, H., Yen, A., Takada, A., Kida, H., Cheng, R. H., & Kawaoka, Y. (2006). Architecture of ribonucleoprotein complexes in influenza A virus particles. Nature, 439(7075), 490-492. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature04378

Architecture of ribonucleoprotein complexes in influenza A virus particles. / Noda, Takeshi; Sagara, Hiroshi; Yen, Albert; Takada, Ayato; Kida, Hiroshi; Cheng, R. Holland; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro.

In: Nature, Vol. 439, No. 7075, 26.01.2006, p. 490-492.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Noda, T, Sagara, H, Yen, A, Takada, A, Kida, H, Cheng, RH & Kawaoka, Y 2006, 'Architecture of ribonucleoprotein complexes in influenza A virus particles', Nature, vol. 439, no. 7075, pp. 490-492. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature04378
Noda T, Sagara H, Yen A, Takada A, Kida H, Cheng RH et al. Architecture of ribonucleoprotein complexes in influenza A virus particles. Nature. 2006 Jan 26;439(7075):490-492. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature04378
Noda, Takeshi ; Sagara, Hiroshi ; Yen, Albert ; Takada, Ayato ; Kida, Hiroshi ; Cheng, R. Holland ; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro. / Architecture of ribonucleoprotein complexes in influenza A virus particles. In: Nature. 2006 ; Vol. 439, No. 7075. pp. 490-492.
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