ApoE genotype affects allele-specific apo[a] levels for large apo[a] sizes in African Americans: The Harlem-Basset Study

Anuurad Erdembileg, Guijing Lu, Jill Rubin, Thomas A. Pearson, Lars Berglund

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

The genetic variability of apolipoprotein E (apoE) influences plasma lipoprotein levels, and allele frequencies differ between African Americans and Caucasians. As African Americans have higher lipoprotein [a] (Lp[a]) levels than Caucasians, we investigated the effects of the apoE gene on allele-specific apolipoprotein [a] (apo[a]) levels across ethnicity. We determined apo[a] sizes, allele-specific apo[a] levels (i.e., levels associated with alleles defined by size), and the apoE gene polymorphism in 231 African Americans and 336 Caucasians. African Americans, but not Caucasians, with the apo E2 genotype had lower levels of Lp[a] compared with those with the apo E4 genotype (9.6 vs. 11.2 nmol/l; P = 0.034, expressed as square root levels). Distribution of apo[a] alleles across apoE genotypes were similar between African Americans and Caucasians. Among African Americans with large apo[a], the allele-specific apo[a] level was significantly lower among ε2 carriers compared with ε3 or ε4 carriers (5.4 vs. 6.6 and 7.4 nmol/l, respectively; P < 0.005, expressed as square root levels). In contrast, there was no significant difference in allele-specific apo[a] levels across apoE genotypes among Caucasians. For large apo[a] sizes, apoE genotype contributed to the observed African American-Caucasian differences in allele-specific apo[a] levels.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)693-698
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Lipid Research
Volume48
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2007

Keywords

  • Apolipoprotein [a]
  • Apolipoprotein E
  • Ethnicity
  • Genetics
  • Lipoprotein [a]
  • Polymorphisms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology

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