Apo E4 and lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 synergistically increase cardiovascular risk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: Apolipoprotein E (apoE) has been implicated as conveying increased risk for coronary artery disease (CAD). Previous studies suggest a role of apoE as a modulator of immune response and inflammatory properties. We hypothesized that the presence of apo E4 is associated with an increased inflammatory burden in subjects with CAD as compared to subjects without CAD. Methods: ApoE genotypes, systemic (C-reactive protein [CRP], fibrinogen, serum amyloid-A [SAA]) and vascular inflammatory markers (Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A 2 [Lp-PLA 2] and pentraxin-3 [PTX-3]) were assessed in 324 Caucasians and 208 African Americans, undergoing coronary angiography. Results: For both ethnic groups, Lp-PLA 2 index, an integrated measure of Lp-PLA 2 mass and activity, increased significantly and stepwise across apoE isoforms (P = 0.009 and P = 0.026 for African Americans and Caucasians respectively). No differences were found for other inflammatory markers tested (CRP, fibrinogen, SAA and PTX-3). For the top cardiovascular score tertile, apo E4 carriers had a significantly higher level of Lp-PLA 2 index in both ethnic groups (P = 0.027 and P = 0.010, respectively). Conclusion: The presence of the apo E4 isoform was associated with a higher level of Lp-PLA 2 index, a marker of vascular inflammation. Our results suggest that genetic variation at the apoE locus may impact cardiovascular disease risk through enhanced vascular inflammation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)230-234
Number of pages5
JournalAtherosclerosis
Volume223
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2012

Keywords

  • ApoE genotype
  • Coronary artery disease
  • Ethnicity
  • Inflammation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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