APA summit on medical student education task force on informatics and technology: Steps to enhance the use of technology in education through faculty development, funding and change management

Donald M. Hilty, Sheldon Benjamin, Gregory Briscoe, Deborah J. Hales, Robert J. Boland, John S. Luo, Carlyle H. Chan, Robert S. Kennedy, Harry Karlinsky, Daniel B. Gordon, Peter Mackinlay Yellowlees, Joel Yager

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: This article provides an overview of how trainees, faculty, and institutions use technology for acquiring knowledge, skills, and attitudes for practicing modern medicine. Method: The authors reviewed the literature on medical education, technology, and change, and identify the key themes and make recommendations for implementing technology in medical education. Results: Administrators and faculty should initially assess their own competencies with technology and then develop a variety of teaching methods that use technology to improve their curricula. Programs should decrease the general knowledge-based content of curricula and increase the use of technology for learning skills. For programs to be successful, they must address faculty development, change management, and funding. Conclusions: Willingness for change, collaboration, and leadership at all levels are essential factors for successfully implementing technology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)444-450
Number of pages7
JournalAcademic Psychiatry
Volume30
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2006

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Informatics
change management
Advisory Committees
Medical Education
Medical Students
medical student
funding
Technology
Education
education
Curriculum
curriculum
Modern 1601-history
method of teaching
Administrative Personnel
trainee
Teaching
Learning
medicine
leadership

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Education

Cite this

APA summit on medical student education task force on informatics and technology : Steps to enhance the use of technology in education through faculty development, funding and change management. / Hilty, Donald M.; Benjamin, Sheldon; Briscoe, Gregory; Hales, Deborah J.; Boland, Robert J.; Luo, John S.; Chan, Carlyle H.; Kennedy, Robert S.; Karlinsky, Harry; Gordon, Daniel B.; Yellowlees, Peter Mackinlay; Yager, Joel.

In: Academic Psychiatry, Vol. 30, No. 6, 01.12.2006, p. 444-450.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hilty, Donald M. ; Benjamin, Sheldon ; Briscoe, Gregory ; Hales, Deborah J. ; Boland, Robert J. ; Luo, John S. ; Chan, Carlyle H. ; Kennedy, Robert S. ; Karlinsky, Harry ; Gordon, Daniel B. ; Yellowlees, Peter Mackinlay ; Yager, Joel. / APA summit on medical student education task force on informatics and technology : Steps to enhance the use of technology in education through faculty development, funding and change management. In: Academic Psychiatry. 2006 ; Vol. 30, No. 6. pp. 444-450.
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