Antiviral activity of phage display selected peptides against Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus in vitro

Ke Liu, Xiuli Feng, Zhiyong Ma, Chao Luo, Bin Zhou, Ruibing Cao, Li Huang, Denian Miao, Ran Pang, Danni He, Xue Lian, Puyan Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome is an important infectious disease of pigs and has a significant harmful effect on the livestock industry, especially in China. PRRSV ORF1b gene encodes primary proteins which play a vital role during PRRSV replication. In this paper, various 12-amino-acid peptides were displayed. These peptides could bind to the polymerase and helicase of PRRSV ORF1b protein, respectively, in which p9 exerted the highest antiviral activity with an IC50 of 56. μM, and the minimum toxicity to cells. It was proved that p9 inhibited PRRSV replication in infected MARC-145 cells in a dose-dependent manner, and the amino acid sequence of HRILMRIR was important for antiviral activity of p9. Also, p9 could bind to the cell membrane and penetrated into cells. These result suggested that p9 might be a potential therapeutic drug for PRRSV infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)73-80
Number of pages8
JournalVirology
Volume432
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 10 2012
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Antiviral peptide
  • Phage display
  • Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Virology

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  • Cite this

    Liu, K., Feng, X., Ma, Z., Luo, C., Zhou, B., Cao, R., Huang, L., Miao, D., Pang, R., He, D., Lian, X., & Chen, P. (2012). Antiviral activity of phage display selected peptides against Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus in vitro. Virology, 432(1), 73-80. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.virol.2012.05.010