Antioxidants in cystic fibrosis. Conclusions from the CF Antioxidant Workshop, Bethesda, Maryland, November 11-12, 2003

André M. Cantin, Terry B. White, Carroll E Cross, Henry Jay Forman, Ronald J. Sokol, Drucy Borowitz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

88 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although great strides are being made in the care of individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF), this condition remains the most common fatal hereditary disease in North America. Numerous links exist between progression of CF lung disease and oxidative stress. The defect in CF is the loss of function of the transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein; recent evidence that CFTR expression and function are modulated by oxidative stress suggests that the loss may result in a poor adaptive response to oxidants. Pancreatic insufficiency in CF also increases susceptibility to deficiencies in lipophilic antioxidants. Finally the airway infection and inflammatory processes in the CF lung are potential sources of oxidants that can affect normal airway physiology and contribute to the mechanisms causing characteristic changes associated with bronchiectasis and loss of lung function. These multiple abnormalities in the oxidant/antioxidant balance raise several possibilities for therapeutic interventions that must be carefully assessed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)15-31
Number of pages17
JournalFree Radical Biology and Medicine
Volume42
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2007

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Oxidants
Cystic Fibrosis
Oxidative stress
Antioxidants
Education
Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator
Pulmonary diseases
Physiology
Oxidative Stress
Multiple Abnormalities
Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency
Lung
Inborn Genetic Diseases
Bronchiectasis
Defects
North America
Lung Diseases
Infection
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Toxicology
  • Clinical Biochemistry

Cite this

Antioxidants in cystic fibrosis. Conclusions from the CF Antioxidant Workshop, Bethesda, Maryland, November 11-12, 2003. / Cantin, André M.; White, Terry B.; Cross, Carroll E; Forman, Henry Jay; Sokol, Ronald J.; Borowitz, Drucy.

In: Free Radical Biology and Medicine, Vol. 42, No. 1, 01.01.2007, p. 15-31.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cantin, André M. ; White, Terry B. ; Cross, Carroll E ; Forman, Henry Jay ; Sokol, Ronald J. ; Borowitz, Drucy. / Antioxidants in cystic fibrosis. Conclusions from the CF Antioxidant Workshop, Bethesda, Maryland, November 11-12, 2003. In: Free Radical Biology and Medicine. 2007 ; Vol. 42, No. 1. pp. 15-31.
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