Antioxidant therapy for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension

Yuichiro J. Suzuki, Robin H Steinhorn, Mark T. Gladwin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Substantial experimental evidence suggests the usefulness of antioxidants for the treatment of various forms of pulmonary hypertension. However, no recommendations have yet been made if patients with pulmonary hypertension should receive pharmacologic and/or dietary antioxidants. Our understanding of antioxidants has evolved greatly over the last two decades, from the primitive use of natural antioxidant vitamins to the modulation of vascular oxidases, such as NAD(P)H oxidases. These oxidases and their products not only regulate pulmonary vascular tone and intimal and smooth muscle thickening, but also modulate the adaptation of the right ventricle to increased afterload. It is important that well-designed randomized clinical trials be conducted to test the importance of oxidase-reactive oxygen species activation in the pathogenesis and treatment of pulmonary hypertension. The purpose of this Forum on Pulmonary Hypertension is to summarize the available preclinical information, which may aid in designing and conducting future randomized clinical trials for evaluating the efficacy of antioxidants for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension. The complexity of oxidative pathways contributed to the tremendous difficulties and challenges in selecting agents, doses, and designing clinical trials. Further studies using human, animal, and cell culture models may be needed to define optimal trials. This Forum on Pulmonary Hypertension should stimulate new thinking and provide essential background information to better define the challenges of developing successful randomized clinical trials in the near future.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1723-1726
Number of pages4
JournalAntioxidants and Redox Signaling
Volume18
Issue number14
DOIs
StatePublished - May 10 2013

Fingerprint

Pulmonary Hypertension
Antioxidants
Oxidoreductases
Randomized Controlled Trials
Blood Vessels
Therapeutics
Tunica Intima
NADPH Oxidase
Cell culture
Vitamins
Muscle
Reactive Oxygen Species
Animals
Chemical activation
Heart Ventricles
Smooth Muscle
Modulation
Cell Culture Techniques
Clinical Trials
Lung

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Physiology
  • Clinical Biochemistry

Cite this

Antioxidant therapy for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension. / Suzuki, Yuichiro J.; Steinhorn, Robin H; Gladwin, Mark T.

In: Antioxidants and Redox Signaling, Vol. 18, No. 14, 10.05.2013, p. 1723-1726.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Suzuki, Yuichiro J. ; Steinhorn, Robin H ; Gladwin, Mark T. / Antioxidant therapy for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension. In: Antioxidants and Redox Signaling. 2013 ; Vol. 18, No. 14. pp. 1723-1726.
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