Antioxidant supplementation and risk of incident melanomas: Results of a large prospective cohort study

Maryam M. Asgari, Sonia S. Maruti, Lawrence H. Kushi, Emily White

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To examine whether antioxidant supplement use is associated with melanoma risk in light of recently published data from the Supplementation in Vitamins and Mineral Antioxidants (SUVIMAX) study, which reported a 4-fold higher melanoma risk in women randomized to receive a supplement with nutritionally appropriate doses of antioxidants. Design: Population-based prospective study (Vitamins and Lifestyle [VITAL] cohort). Setting: Western Washington State. Participants: A total of 69 671 men and women who self-reported (1) intake of multivitamins and supplemental antioxidants, including selenium and beta carotene, during the past 10 years and (2) melanoma risk factors on a baseline questionnaire. Main Outcome Measure: Incident melanoma identified through linkage to the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) cancer registry. Results: Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate multivariable relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for multivitamin, supplemental selenium, and supplemental beta carotene use. After adjusting for melanoma risk factors, we did not detect a significant association between multivitamin use and melanoma risk in women (RR, 1.14; 95% CI, 0.78-1.66) or in men (RR, 1.09; 95% CI, 0.83-1.43). Moreover, we did not observe increased melanoma risk with the use of supplemental beta carotene (RR, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.48-1.56) or selenium (RR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.69-1.41) at doses comparable with those of the SUVIMAX study. Conclusion: Antioxidants taken in nutritional doses do not seem to increase melanoma risk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)879-882
Number of pages4
JournalArchives of Dermatology
Volume145
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Melanoma
Cohort Studies
Antioxidants
Prospective Studies
Confidence Intervals
beta Carotene
Selenium
Vitamins
Minerals
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Life Style
Epidemiology
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

Cite this

Antioxidant supplementation and risk of incident melanomas : Results of a large prospective cohort study. / Asgari, Maryam M.; Maruti, Sonia S.; Kushi, Lawrence H.; White, Emily.

In: Archives of Dermatology, Vol. 145, No. 8, 08.2009, p. 879-882.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Asgari, Maryam M. ; Maruti, Sonia S. ; Kushi, Lawrence H. ; White, Emily. / Antioxidant supplementation and risk of incident melanomas : Results of a large prospective cohort study. In: Archives of Dermatology. 2009 ; Vol. 145, No. 8. pp. 879-882.
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title = "Antioxidant supplementation and risk of incident melanomas: Results of a large prospective cohort study",
abstract = "Objective: To examine whether antioxidant supplement use is associated with melanoma risk in light of recently published data from the Supplementation in Vitamins and Mineral Antioxidants (SUVIMAX) study, which reported a 4-fold higher melanoma risk in women randomized to receive a supplement with nutritionally appropriate doses of antioxidants. Design: Population-based prospective study (Vitamins and Lifestyle [VITAL] cohort). Setting: Western Washington State. Participants: A total of 69 671 men and women who self-reported (1) intake of multivitamins and supplemental antioxidants, including selenium and beta carotene, during the past 10 years and (2) melanoma risk factors on a baseline questionnaire. Main Outcome Measure: Incident melanoma identified through linkage to the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) cancer registry. Results: Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate multivariable relative risks (RRs) and 95{\%} confidence intervals (CIs) for multivitamin, supplemental selenium, and supplemental beta carotene use. After adjusting for melanoma risk factors, we did not detect a significant association between multivitamin use and melanoma risk in women (RR, 1.14; 95{\%} CI, 0.78-1.66) or in men (RR, 1.09; 95{\%} CI, 0.83-1.43). Moreover, we did not observe increased melanoma risk with the use of supplemental beta carotene (RR, 0.87; 95{\%} CI, 0.48-1.56) or selenium (RR, 0.98; 95{\%} CI, 0.69-1.41) at doses comparable with those of the SUVIMAX study. Conclusion: Antioxidants taken in nutritional doses do not seem to increase melanoma risk.",
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