Antimicrobial resistance in Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Dublin from dairy source calves in the central San Joaquin Valley, California (1998-2002)

Anna Catharina B Berge, Elizabeth Thornburg, John M Adaska, Robert B. Moeller, Patricia C Blanchard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

The present study describes antimicrobial resistance patterns of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Dublin (S. Dublin) in clinical submissions from calves and temporal and farm-type trends in antimicrobial resistance patterns of the isolates. A total of 300 isolates of S. Dublin were obtained from fecal or internal organs of calves fewer than 120 days of age originating from 84 dairies and 18 calf ranches from July 1998 to December 2002. The isolates were susceptibility tested to a panel of 10 antimicrobials using the disk diffusion assay. Temporal and farm-type trends in individual antimicrobial inhibition zone sizes were assessed and antimicrobial resistance patterns were described using cluster analysis. Isolates obtained from calf ranches compared with dairies exhibited decreased susceptibility to florfenicol, gentamicin, neomycin, sulfisoxazole, sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim, and tetracycline. During the years 1998-2002, decreasing susceptibility was seen for ceftiofur, enrofloxacin, and sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim. There were 20 different antimicrobial resistance patterns in the isolate set, indicating that S. Dublin has the ability to transfer and pick up resistance genes with relative ease. The trends seen in antimicrobial resistance in S. Dublin may likely be linked to antimicrobial drug use in young calves.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)497-500
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation
Volume20
Issue number4
StatePublished - Jul 1 2008

Keywords

  • Antimicrobial resistance
  • Dairy calves
  • Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

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