Antigen removal for the production of biomechanically functional, xenogeneic tissue grafts

Derek Cissell, Jerry C. Hu, Leigh G. Griffiths, Kyriacos A. Athanasiou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Xenogeneic tissues are derived from other animal species and provide a source of material for engineering mechanically functional tissue grafts, such as heart valves, tendons, ligaments, and cartilage. Xenogeneic tissues, however, contain molecules, known as antigens, which invoke an immune reaction following implantation into a patient. Therefore, it is necessary to remove the antigens from a xenogeneic tissue to prevent immune rejection of the graft. Antigen removal can be accomplished by treating a tissue with solutions and/or physical processes that disrupt cells and solubilize, degrade, or mask antigens. However, processes used for cell and antigen removal from tissues often have deleterious effects on the extracellular matrix (ECM) of the tissue, rendering the tissue unsuitable for implantation due to poor mechanical properties. Thus, the goal of an antigen removal process should be to reduce the antigen content of a xenogeneic tissue while preserving its mechanical functionality. To expand the clinical use of antigen-removed xenogeneic tissues as biomechanically functional grafts, it is essential that researchers examine tissue antigen content, ECM composition and architecture, and mechanical properties as new antigen removal processes are developed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1987-1996
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Biomechanics
Volume47
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 27 2014

Fingerprint

Antigens
Grafts
Tissue
Transplants
Heterophile Antigens
Extracellular Matrix
Physical Phenomena
Antigen-antibody reactions
Mechanical properties
Heart Valves
Graft Rejection
Masks
Ligaments
Tendons
Cartilage
Animals
Research Personnel
Molecules

Keywords

  • Antigen removal
  • Decellularization
  • Tissue replacement
  • Xenogeneic

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Rehabilitation
  • Biophysics
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

Antigen removal for the production of biomechanically functional, xenogeneic tissue grafts. / Cissell, Derek; Hu, Jerry C.; Griffiths, Leigh G.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

In: Journal of Biomechanics, Vol. 47, No. 9, 27.06.2014, p. 1987-1996.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cissell, Derek ; Hu, Jerry C. ; Griffiths, Leigh G. ; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A. / Antigen removal for the production of biomechanically functional, xenogeneic tissue grafts. In: Journal of Biomechanics. 2014 ; Vol. 47, No. 9. pp. 1987-1996.
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