Anisotropic volume rendering for extremely dense, thin line data

Greg Schussman, Kwan-Liu Ma

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Many large scale physics-based simulations which take place on PC clusters or supercomputers produce huge amounts of data including vector fields. While these vector data such as electromagnetic fields, fluid flow fields, or particle paths can be represented by lines, the sheer number of the lines overwhelms the memory and computation capability of a high-end PC used for visualization. Further, very dense or intertwined lines, rendered with traditional visualization techniques, can produce unintelligible results with unclear depth relationships between the lines and no sense of global structure. Our approach is to apply a lighting model to the lines and sample them into an anisotropic voxel representation based on spherical harmonics as a preprocessing step. Then we evaluate and render these voxels for a given view using traditional volume rendering. For extremely large line based datasets, conversion to anisotropic voxels reduces the overall storage and rendering for O(n) lines to O(1) with a large constant that is still small enough to allow meaningful visualization of the entire dataset at nearly interactive rates on a single commodity PC.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationIEEE Visualization 2004 - Proceedings, VIS 2004
EditorsH. Rushmeier, G. Turk, J.J. Wijk
Pages107-114
Number of pages8
StatePublished - Dec 1 2004
EventIEEE Visualization 2004 - Proceedings, VIS 2004 - Austin, TX, United States
Duration: Oct 10 2004Oct 15 2004

Other

OtherIEEE Visualization 2004 - Proceedings, VIS 2004
CountryUnited States
CityAustin, TX
Period10/10/0410/15/04

Fingerprint

Volume rendering
Visualization
Supercomputers
Electromagnetic fields
Flow of fluids
Flow fields
Physics
Lighting
Data storage equipment

Keywords

  • Anisotropic lighting
  • Line data
  • Scientific visualization
  • Vector field
  • Volume rendering

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Schussman, G., & Ma, K-L. (2004). Anisotropic volume rendering for extremely dense, thin line data. In H. Rushmeier, G. Turk, & J. J. Wijk (Eds.), IEEE Visualization 2004 - Proceedings, VIS 2004 (pp. 107-114)

Anisotropic volume rendering for extremely dense, thin line data. / Schussman, Greg; Ma, Kwan-Liu.

IEEE Visualization 2004 - Proceedings, VIS 2004. ed. / H. Rushmeier; G. Turk; J.J. Wijk. 2004. p. 107-114.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Schussman, G & Ma, K-L 2004, Anisotropic volume rendering for extremely dense, thin line data. in H Rushmeier, G Turk & JJ Wijk (eds), IEEE Visualization 2004 - Proceedings, VIS 2004. pp. 107-114, IEEE Visualization 2004 - Proceedings, VIS 2004, Austin, TX, United States, 10/10/04.
Schussman G, Ma K-L. Anisotropic volume rendering for extremely dense, thin line data. In Rushmeier H, Turk G, Wijk JJ, editors, IEEE Visualization 2004 - Proceedings, VIS 2004. 2004. p. 107-114
Schussman, Greg ; Ma, Kwan-Liu. / Anisotropic volume rendering for extremely dense, thin line data. IEEE Visualization 2004 - Proceedings, VIS 2004. editor / H. Rushmeier ; G. Turk ; J.J. Wijk. 2004. pp. 107-114
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