Animal models of obesity and diabetes mellitus

Maximilian Kleinert, Christoffer Clemmensen, Susanna M. Hofmann, Mary C. Moore, Simone Renner, Stephen C. Woods, Peter Huypens, Johannes Beckers, Martin Hrabe De Angelis, Annette Schürmann, Mostafa Bakhti, Martin Klingenspor, Mark Heiman, Alan D. Cherrington, Michael Ristow, Heiko Lickert, Eckhard Wolf, Peter J Havel, Timo D. Müller, Matthias H. Tschöp

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

63 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

More than one-third of the worldwide population is overweight or obese and therefore at risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus. In order to mitigate this pandemic, safer and more potent therapeutics are urgently required. This necessitates the continued use of animal models to discover, validate and optimize novel therapeutics for their safe use in humans. In order to improve the transition from bench to bedside, researchers must not only carefully select the appropriate model but also draw the right conclusions. In this Review, we consolidate the key information on the currently available animal models of obesity and diabetes and highlight the advantages, limitations and important caveats of each of these models.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)140-162
Number of pages23
JournalNature Reviews Endocrinology
Volume14
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2018

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Diabetes Mellitus
Animal Models
Obesity
Pandemics
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Research Personnel
Therapeutics
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology

Cite this

Kleinert, M., Clemmensen, C., Hofmann, S. M., Moore, M. C., Renner, S., Woods, S. C., ... Tschöp, M. H. (2018). Animal models of obesity and diabetes mellitus. Nature Reviews Endocrinology, 14(3), 140-162. https://doi.org/10.1038/nrendo.2017.161

Animal models of obesity and diabetes mellitus. / Kleinert, Maximilian; Clemmensen, Christoffer; Hofmann, Susanna M.; Moore, Mary C.; Renner, Simone; Woods, Stephen C.; Huypens, Peter; Beckers, Johannes; De Angelis, Martin Hrabe; Schürmann, Annette; Bakhti, Mostafa; Klingenspor, Martin; Heiman, Mark; Cherrington, Alan D.; Ristow, Michael; Lickert, Heiko; Wolf, Eckhard; Havel, Peter J; Müller, Timo D.; Tschöp, Matthias H.

In: Nature Reviews Endocrinology, Vol. 14, No. 3, 01.03.2018, p. 140-162.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Kleinert, M, Clemmensen, C, Hofmann, SM, Moore, MC, Renner, S, Woods, SC, Huypens, P, Beckers, J, De Angelis, MH, Schürmann, A, Bakhti, M, Klingenspor, M, Heiman, M, Cherrington, AD, Ristow, M, Lickert, H, Wolf, E, Havel, PJ, Müller, TD & Tschöp, MH 2018, 'Animal models of obesity and diabetes mellitus', Nature Reviews Endocrinology, vol. 14, no. 3, pp. 140-162. https://doi.org/10.1038/nrendo.2017.161
Kleinert M, Clemmensen C, Hofmann SM, Moore MC, Renner S, Woods SC et al. Animal models of obesity and diabetes mellitus. Nature Reviews Endocrinology. 2018 Mar 1;14(3):140-162. https://doi.org/10.1038/nrendo.2017.161
Kleinert, Maximilian ; Clemmensen, Christoffer ; Hofmann, Susanna M. ; Moore, Mary C. ; Renner, Simone ; Woods, Stephen C. ; Huypens, Peter ; Beckers, Johannes ; De Angelis, Martin Hrabe ; Schürmann, Annette ; Bakhti, Mostafa ; Klingenspor, Martin ; Heiman, Mark ; Cherrington, Alan D. ; Ristow, Michael ; Lickert, Heiko ; Wolf, Eckhard ; Havel, Peter J ; Müller, Timo D. ; Tschöp, Matthias H. / Animal models of obesity and diabetes mellitus. In: Nature Reviews Endocrinology. 2018 ; Vol. 14, No. 3. pp. 140-162.
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