Anesthetic induction with guaifenesin and propofol in adult horses

Robert J Brosnan, Eugene Steffey, André Escobar, Mine Palazoglu, Oliver Fiehn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective-To evaluate whether guaifenesin can prevent adverse anesthetic induction events caused by propofol and whether a guaifenesin-propofol induction combination has brief cardiovascular effects commensurate with rapid drug washout. Animals-8 healthy adult horses. Procedures-Guaifenesin was administered IV for 3 minutes followed by IV injection of a bolus of propofol (2 mg/kg). Additional propofol was administered if purposeful movement was detected. Anesthesia was maintained for 2 hours with isoflurane or sevoflurane at 1.2 times the minimum alveolar concentration with controlled normocapnic ventilation. Normotension was maintained via a dobutamine infusion. Plasma concentrations of propofol and guaifenesin were measured every 30 minutes. Results-Mean ± SD guaifenesin and propofol doses inducing anesthesia in half of the horses were 73 ± 18 mg/kg and 2.2 ± 0.3 mg/kg, respectively. No adverse anesthetic induction events were observed. By 70 minutes, there was no significant temporal change in the dobutamine infusion rate required to maintain normotension for horses anesthetized with isoflurane or sevoflurane. Mean plasma guaifenesin concentrations were 122 ± 30μM, 101 ± 33μM, 93 ± 28μM, and 80 ± 24μM at 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes after anesthetic induction, respectively. All plasma propofol concentrations were below the limit of quantitation. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-Guaifenesin prevented adverse anesthetic induction events caused by propofol. Guaifenesin (90 mg/kg) followed by propofol (3 mg/kg) should be sufficient to immobilize > 99% of calm healthy adult horses. Anesthetic drug washout was rapid, and there was no change in inotrope requirements after anesthesia for 70 minutes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1569-1575
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Veterinary Research
Volume72
Issue number12
StatePublished - Dec 2011

Fingerprint

Guaifenesin
guaifenesin
Propofol
anesthetics
Horses
Anesthetics
horses
anesthesia
isoflurane
Dobutamine
Anesthesia
Isoflurane
drugs
intravenous injection
Ventilation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Anesthetic induction with guaifenesin and propofol in adult horses. / Brosnan, Robert J; Steffey, Eugene; Escobar, André; Palazoglu, Mine; Fiehn, Oliver.

In: American Journal of Veterinary Research, Vol. 72, No. 12, 12.2011, p. 1569-1575.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brosnan, Robert J ; Steffey, Eugene ; Escobar, André ; Palazoglu, Mine ; Fiehn, Oliver. / Anesthetic induction with guaifenesin and propofol in adult horses. In: American Journal of Veterinary Research. 2011 ; Vol. 72, No. 12. pp. 1569-1575.
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abstract = "Objective-To evaluate whether guaifenesin can prevent adverse anesthetic induction events caused by propofol and whether a guaifenesin-propofol induction combination has brief cardiovascular effects commensurate with rapid drug washout. Animals-8 healthy adult horses. Procedures-Guaifenesin was administered IV for 3 minutes followed by IV injection of a bolus of propofol (2 mg/kg). Additional propofol was administered if purposeful movement was detected. Anesthesia was maintained for 2 hours with isoflurane or sevoflurane at 1.2 times the minimum alveolar concentration with controlled normocapnic ventilation. Normotension was maintained via a dobutamine infusion. Plasma concentrations of propofol and guaifenesin were measured every 30 minutes. Results-Mean ± SD guaifenesin and propofol doses inducing anesthesia in half of the horses were 73 ± 18 mg/kg and 2.2 ± 0.3 mg/kg, respectively. No adverse anesthetic induction events were observed. By 70 minutes, there was no significant temporal change in the dobutamine infusion rate required to maintain normotension for horses anesthetized with isoflurane or sevoflurane. Mean plasma guaifenesin concentrations were 122 ± 30μM, 101 ± 33μM, 93 ± 28μM, and 80 ± 24μM at 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes after anesthetic induction, respectively. All plasma propofol concentrations were below the limit of quantitation. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-Guaifenesin prevented adverse anesthetic induction events caused by propofol. Guaifenesin (90 mg/kg) followed by propofol (3 mg/kg) should be sufficient to immobilize > 99{\%} of calm healthy adult horses. Anesthetic drug washout was rapid, and there was no change in inotrope requirements after anesthesia for 70 minutes.",
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