Anemia in urban underprivileged children. Iron, folate, and vitamin B12 nutrition

G. Margo, Y. Baroni, Ralph Green, J. Metz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The prevalence and type of nutritional anemia was investigated in 344 children aged 1 to 6 yr of mixed race and living in a poor urban setting. Iron deficiency anemia was common in 1-yr-old children (23%) as was biochemical evidence of iron deficiency (53%). Anemia rates were minimal in older children and the prevalence of iron deficiency decreased with age. Folate deficiency did not appear to contribute to the etiology of anemia, and nutritional vitamin B12 deficiency was not present. No relationship could be found between a number of familial variables and hematological nutritional status. It is suggested that to identify families whose children are at risk for nutritional anemia new approaches will be needed to define their characteristics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)947-954
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume30
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1977
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

vitamin B12
Vitamin B 12
Folic Acid
folic acid
Anemia
Iron
anemia
iron
nutrition
Vitamin B 12 Deficiency
iron deficiency anemia
Iron-Deficiency Anemias
Nutritional Status
nutritional status
etiology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Anemia in urban underprivileged children. Iron, folate, and vitamin B12 nutrition. / Margo, G.; Baroni, Y.; Green, Ralph; Metz, J.

In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 30, No. 6, 1977, p. 947-954.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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